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  Bug Bottom.JPG - BALDWIN LIGHTING BUG – Brass Baldwin lighting bug cap lamp, marked on top BALDWIN CARBIDE LAMP with S diamond and LICENSED UNDER PAT. with 4 patent dates from 1900 to 1914 and the lighting bug logo, bottom marked with S diamond JOHN SIMMONS CO NEW YORK USA, with hard to find nickel-plated brass slip on reflector, ex-Neil Tysver collection (Frederic E. Baldwin is generally considered the father of underground acetylene carbide lighting in the U.S. His Full Moon lamp shown elsewhere in the carbide hand lamp photos is considered the first mining carbide lamp. Located in New York City, Baldwin contracted with the John Simmons Co. also of New York City to market and manufacture his lamps. Shortly thereafter, lamps featuring the distinctive inverted conical hour-glass shape that distinguishes Baldwin cap lamps were produced by Simmons.  For whatever reason, Baldwin and Simmons parted in 1913, Baldwin to pursue the ZAR lamp development noted elsewhere in the cap lamp photos and Simmons to continue to market both Baldwin and Simmons-branded lamps. The Simmons Co. manufactured its own cap and superintendent lamps marked with the distinctive raised S in a diamond trade mark. On August 24, 1915, Simmons obtained a trademark for the "Baldwin Lighting Bug" which appeared on the top of lamps along with the Simmons diamond-shaped S logo as shown here. This logo was used as early as June 1, 1914.  Some would argue that the bug is a firefly while others may call it a cockroach.  You be the judge.  Simmons’ advertising for the lighting bug lamp featured claims for a non-clogging burner and a rigid removable reflector.  The lighting bug lamps were produced in both cap lamp and superintendent-style lamps, in both brass and nickel plate, and are known with  different reflectors and water controls.  These lamps feature patent dates of 1900, 1901, 1913 and 1914 in stamped raised letters on the top but none applies to the visual shape or design of the lamp. The Aug. 28, 1900 patent #656,874 by Baldwin applies to fourteen acetylene gas generation features for a bicycle lamp. The Dec. 17, 1901 patent #688,926 by Alvin L. Buffington of Minneapolis, MN is for improvements in acetylene lamps for use on bicycles.  Even more obscure, the Feb. 4, 1913 patent #1,052,134 by Ulysse Daubresse of Novinger, MO is for an improved water feed for acetylene lamps.  Lastly, the Jan. 6, 1914 patent #1,083,427 is a Baldwin patent but it’s for the design of the ZAR lamp, little to do with this lamp.  And this lamp is called the Baldwin Carbide Lamp.  So much for patents but they do make a great marketing tool.  During the next few years the Baldwin/Simmons lamps would enjoy enormous popularity in both the metal mines and the coal mines. The company even boasted in 1913 that 80% of the carbide lamps in use are Baldwin lamps. Baldwin and Simmons continued to produce and market a growing number of cap and superintendent's-style lamp varieties for miners. Of note is the Pioneer lamp that was heavily advertised by Simmons around 1917. These lamps were among the last lamps marketed by Simmons as the company merged with the Dewar Co. in the 1919-20 timeframe.)  
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Simmons Ad 1910 Coal Field Directory
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Bug Bottom | BALDWIN LIGHTING BUG – Brass Baldwin lighting bug cap lamp, marked on top BALDWIN CARBIDE LAMP with S diamond and LICENSED UNDER PAT. with 4 patent dates from 1900 to 1914 and the lighting bug logo, bottom marked with S diamond JOHN SIMMONS CO NEW YORK USA, with hard to find nickel-plated brass slip on reflector, ex-Neil Tysver collection (Frederic E. Baldwin is generally considered the father of underground acetylene carbide lighting in the U.S. His Full Moon lamp shown elsewhere in the carbide hand lamp photos is considered the first mining carbide lamp. Located in New York City, Baldwin contracted with the John Simmons Co. also of New York City to market and manufacture his lamps. Shortly thereafter, lamps featuring the distinctive inverted conical hour-glass shape that distinguishes Baldwin cap lamps were produced by Simmons. For whatever reason, Baldwin and Simmons parted in 1913, Baldwin to pursue the ZAR lamp development noted elsewhere in the cap lamp photos and Simmons to continue to market both Baldwin and Simmons-branded lamps. The Simmons Co. manufactured its own cap and superintendent lamps marked with the distinctive raised S in a diamond trade mark. On August 24, 1915, Simmons obtained a trademark for the "Baldwin Lighting Bug" which appeared on the top of lamps along with the Simmons diamond-shaped S logo as shown here. This logo was used as early as June 1, 1914. Some would argue that the bug is a firefly while others may call it a cockroach. You be the judge. Simmons’ advertising for the lighting bug lamp featured claims for a non-clogging burner and a rigid removable reflector. The lighting bug lamps were produced in both cap lamp and superintendent-style lamps, in both brass and nickel plate, and are known with different reflectors and water controls. These lamps feature patent dates of 1900, 1901, 1913 and 1914 in stamped raised letters on the top but none applies to the visual shape or design of the lamp. The Aug. 28, 1900 patent #656,874 by Baldwin applies to fourteen acetylene gas generation features for a bicycle lamp. The Dec. 17, 1901 patent #688,926 by Alvin L. Buffington of Minneapolis, MN is for improvements in acetylene lamps for use on bicycles. Even more obscure, the Feb. 4, 1913 patent #1,052,134 by Ulysse Daubresse of Novinger, MO is for an improved water feed for acetylene lamps. Lastly, the Jan. 6, 1914 patent #1,083,427 is a Baldwin patent but it’s for the design of the ZAR lamp, little to do with this lamp. And this lamp is called the Baldwin Carbide Lamp. So much for patents but they do make a great marketing tool. During the next few years the Baldwin/Simmons lamps would enjoy enormous popularity in both the metal mines and the coal mines. The company even boasted in 1913 that 80% of the carbide lamps in use are Baldwin lamps. Baldwin and Simmons continued to produce and market a growing number of cap and superintendent's-style lamp varieties for miners. Of note is the Pioneer lamp that was heavily advertised by Simmons around 1917. These lamps were among the last lamps marketed by Simmons as the company merged with the Dewar Co. in the 1919-20 timeframe.) Download Original Image
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