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Daylight P&H Spare Bottom Marking
Defender Beaded LSide
Defender Beaded RSide
Defender Beaded Back
Defender Beaded Bottom
  Defender Ribbed.JPG - RIBBED DEFENDER BRASS - Hard to find brass ribbed Defender cap lamp with strap cap braces, marked on top TRADEMARK DEFENDER PAT. 2.1.21, OTHERS PEND., MADE IN USA, RD 68155, POLYGON FEED, PAT 2.2.22,bottom marked DEC.30,19 MADE IN USA PATENTED, brace markedBRACKET PAT APLD FOR, back of reflector marked PAT APLD FORMADE IN USA in ring around sparker, three piece water door, unfired condition; ex-Bob Schroth collection  (The Justrite Victor and its sister lamps, the Defender and X-Ray, have distinctive ornamental designs and probably have more markings on the various lamp parts than any other carbide lamp.  After Augie Hansen, chief designer at Justrite, left the company in 1920 to pursue his Drylite and Force Feed lamps, William J. Frisbie took his place at Justrite.  He filed a design patent #57,037 on May 22, 1920 on a new lamp that would be produced by Justrite with the Victor name.  The patent was granted on Feb 1, 1921 and lamps manufactured after that date are marked with this patent date.  Justrite made the Victor lamp prior to the patent award and these earlier lamps are marked with "Patent Appl'd For."  Frisbie filed additional patents for features that were incorporated in the Victor lamps including the polygon water feed, side brace attachment,  reflector brace and improved felt retainer among others.  In April 1922, Justrite introduced a sister lamp that replaced the vertical striping on the lamp body with raised dots calling it the Defender.  Both lamps were available in both brass and nickel-plated brass.  Soon thereafter, Justrite once again retooled their production to market a lamp called the X-Ray, not to be confused by an earlier Justrite lamp named X-Ray that included a square reflector brace.  All three lamps can be found with both vertical striping (shown here is the Defender in brass with vertical striping) and dots on the tanks and in both brass and nickel-plated brass.  Except for the markings on top, all three lamps are essentially the same.  One can't help but wonder why Justrite marketed these new brand names at a time when their Justrite trademarked lamps were enjoying popularity and substantial success within the mining community.  See Puhl, Mining Artifact Collector #4, pp 3-10)   
Defender Ribbed Bottom
Frisbie Patent
Ever Ready Ad Engineering Journal March 7 1914
Ever Ready LSide
Ever Ready Front

Defender Ribbed | RIBBED DEFENDER BRASS - Hard to find brass ribbed Defender cap lamp with strap cap braces, marked on top TRADEMARK DEFENDER PAT. 2.1.21, OTHERS PEND., MADE IN USA, RD 68155, POLYGON FEED, PAT 2.2.22, bottom marked DEC.30,19 MADE IN USA PATENTED, brace marked BRACKET PAT APLD FOR, back of reflector marked PAT APLD FOR MADE IN USA in ring around sparker, three piece water door, unfired condition; ex-Bob Schroth collection (The Justrite Victor and its sister lamps, the Defender and X-Ray, have distinctive ornamental designs and probably have more markings on the various lamp parts than any other carbide lamp. After Augie Hansen, chief designer at Justrite, left the company in 1920 to pursue his Drylite and Force Feed lamps, William J. Frisbie took his place at Justrite. He filed a design patent #57,037 on May 22, 1920 on a new lamp that would be produced by Justrite with the Victor name. The patent was granted on Feb 1, 1921 and lamps manufactured after that date are marked with this patent date. Justrite made the Victor lamp prior to the patent award and these earlier lamps are marked with "Patent Appl'd For." Frisbie filed additional patents for features that were incorporated in the Victor lamps including the polygon water feed, side brace attachment, reflector brace and improved felt retainer among others. In April 1922, Justrite introduced a sister lamp that replaced the vertical striping on the lamp body with raised dots calling it the Defender. Both lamps were available in both brass and nickel-plated brass. Soon thereafter, Justrite once again retooled their production to market a lamp called the X-Ray, not to be confused by an earlier Justrite lamp named X-Ray that included a square reflector brace. All three lamps can be found with both vertical striping (shown here is the Defender in brass with vertical striping) and dots on the tanks and in both brass and nickel-plated brass. Except for the markings on top, all three lamps are essentially the same. One can't help but wonder why Justrite marketed these new brand names at a time when their Justrite trademarked lamps were enjoying popularity and substantial success within the mining community. See Puhl, Mining Artifact Collector #4, pp 3-10) Download Original Image
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