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The Buddy Patents Marking
The Buddy with Reflector Removed
The Buddy Bottom
The Buddy Flanged Water Fill
Victor Non Justrite LSide
  Victor Non Justrite RSide.JPG - VICTOR NON JUSTRITE - Rare brass non-Justrite Victor cap lamp, unmarked with slanted 2 3/8 in. reflector, 2 3/16 in. base dia., 4 in. to top of water control screw, threaded water fill cap, complete with felt retainer and screen  (The Victor [non-Justrite] lamp is an interesting piece of history in the production of early carbide lamps.  In an excellent article by Dave Des Marais, he makes a compelling argument that the early Victor led to the Acme and then the Pathfinder through improvements in a single manufacturing sequence and that the manufacturer was Hughes Bros. of Scranton, PA.  Comparisons of lamp characteristics including the water tanks, water feeds, water doors, reflectors and bases for all three lamps support this argument.  Since the Victor and Acme are unmarked, the evidence is somewhat circumstantial but other aspects of the competition between Hughes Bros. and the Scranton Acetylene Lamp Company, makers of the Scranton and Scranto lamps, validates that the Victor was the earliest ancestor in the sequence and Hughes Bros. was the manufacturer.  The Victor lamp was identified by markings on the sides of one box showing the lamp with the name Victor marked on the lamp base.  The manufacturing date is thought to be in the very early 1910s.  The Hughes Bros. of Scranton had already become a major supplier of safety lamps by 1912, claiming 40 years of experience in their ads at the time.  That year the first of the ads for the Pathfinder lamp appeared in Mines and Minerals Magazine.  The Victor predates this lamp and is likely the company’s first attempt in the carbide lamp market.  The Hughes Bros., Ralph W. and William H., were in business at 420 South Main Avenue at this time.  By 1920 a third brother Sidney R. Hughes had joined the company and the business was now located at 510-12 North 9th Avenue.  Sidney went on to become president of the company by 1931 when its name was changed to Hughes Brass Works.  By 1937, the company was out of business. See Des Marais, Eureka #12, pp 29-35 and Clemmer, American Miners’ Carbide Lamps, p 75)  
Victor Non Justrite Back
Victor Non Justrite Bottom
Victor Cap Brass LSide
Victor Cap Brass RSide
Victor Cap Brass Back

Victor Non Justrite RSide | VICTOR NON JUSTRITE - Rare brass non-Justrite Victor cap lamp, unmarked with slanted 2 3/8 in. reflector, 2 3/16 in. base dia., 4 in. to top of water control screw, threaded water fill cap, complete with felt retainer and screen (The Victor [non-Justrite] lamp is an interesting piece of history in the production of early carbide lamps. In an excellent article by Dave Des Marais, he makes a compelling argument that the early Victor led to the Acme and then the Pathfinder through improvements in a single manufacturing sequence and that the manufacturer was Hughes Bros. of Scranton, PA. Comparisons of lamp characteristics including the water tanks, water feeds, water doors, reflectors and bases for all three lamps support this argument. Since the Victor and Acme are unmarked, the evidence is somewhat circumstantial but other aspects of the competition between Hughes Bros. and the Scranton Acetylene Lamp Company, makers of the Scranton and Scranto lamps, validates that the Victor was the earliest ancestor in the sequence and Hughes Bros. was the manufacturer. The Victor lamp was identified by markings on the sides of one box showing the lamp with the name Victor marked on the lamp base. The manufacturing date is thought to be in the very early 1910s. The Hughes Bros. of Scranton had already become a major supplier of safety lamps by 1912, claiming 40 years of experience in their ads at the time. That year the first of the ads for the Pathfinder lamp appeared in Mines and Minerals Magazine. The Victor predates this lamp and is likely the company’s first attempt in the carbide lamp market. The Hughes Bros., Ralph W. and William H., were in business at 420 South Main Avenue at this time. By 1920 a third brother Sidney R. Hughes had joined the company and the business was now located at 510-12 North 9th Avenue. Sidney went on to become president of the company by 1931 when its name was changed to Hughes Brass Works. By 1937, the company was out of business. See Des Marais, Eureka #12, pp 29-35 and Clemmer, American Miners’ Carbide Lamps, p 75) Download Original Image
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