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Baldwin Gas Lamp LSide
Baldwin Gas Lamp Front
Baldwin Gas Lamp RSide
British Journal Article on Baldwin Gas Lamp
Baldwin Gas Lamp Back
  Baldwin Gas Lamp Top.JPG - BALDWIN GAS LAMP - Hard to find brass carbide bicycle lamp, precursor to first miner’s carbide lamp by Frederic Baldwin known as the Full Moon, marked on top OPEN SHUT on either side of fill cap and BALDWIN ACETYLENE LAMP U.S.A. on shoulder at top of carbide chamber, 6 in. high with 3 clutches on base of 2 5/8 in. dia, with screw catch on back side and deep dish 3 3/8 in. dia. screw on German silver reflector, nickel plated  (This bicycle lamp is the subject of Frederic E. Baldwin’s noteworthy patent for an acetylene gas lamp filed on Oct. 18, 1899 and awarded on Aug. 28, 1900 as Patent No. 656,874. As noted in the patent claims, the lamp was especially designed for use as a bicycle or carriage lamp but also for general use.  The lamp is historically significant in that the follow-on modification to this lamp known as the Full Moon became the first carbide lamp advertised and marketed for mining use. The history and photos of the Full Moon lamp are discussed elsewhere in the carbide hand lamp section of my website.   An interesting description of the Baldwin Acetylene Bicycle Lamp is presented in the July 13, 1900 edition of the English Mechanic and World of Science No. 1842.  The article as paraphrased in the following notes that a lamp which is noteworthy for its “cheapness, cleanliness, simplicity and efficiency” has been introduced by Mr. A. H. Funke of 101-103 Duane Street, Manhattan, New York City.  The article goes on to describe the Baldwin lamp as termed by Mr. Funke as comprises a water tank in the upper part of the lamp and a carbide chamber secured to the base of the lamp by three clips.  The carbide rests upon a removable tray provided with a central perforated tube about which a porous fabric is wrapped.  A spring-pressed follower is employed to prevent the carbide from being jolted out of its chamber.  The follower consists of two centrally perforated discs connected by a helical spring.  Water is fed through to the central tube of the carbide tray by a small downwardly projecting duct provided with a valve, the stem of which is screwed to the top of the water tank.  An index finger is provided to show whether the valve is open or closed. The filled tank with the valve open trickles water into the central tube of the tray, percolates through the porous fabric, and generates gas as it comes into contact with the carbide.  The gas is filtered through cotton and fed to a burner located in the focus of a powerful parabolic reflector.  By releasing the clips which hold the carbide chamber in place, the chamber can be removed without soiling the fingers.  The burner pipe can be cleaned by unscrewing the reflector.  The lamp weighs 11 oz., is only 6 in. high, and throws a brilliant white light for a distance of 50 ft. The lamp is made entirely of brass, well finished and nickel plated and is furnished with a German silver reflector which can easily be cleaned and will not become yellow.)  
Baldwin Gas Lamp Booklet Front
Baldwin Gas Lamp Booklet Inside
Baldwin Gas Lamp Marking I
Baldwin Gas Lamp Marking II
Baldwin Gas Lamp with Screw Off Reflector

Baldwin Gas Lamp Top | BALDWIN GAS LAMP - Hard to find brass carbide bicycle lamp, precursor to first miner’s carbide lamp by Frederic Baldwin known as the Full Moon, marked on top OPEN SHUT on either side of fill cap and BALDWIN ACETYLENE LAMP U.S.A. on shoulder at top of carbide chamber, 6 in. high with 3 clutches on base of 2 5/8 in. dia, with screw catch on back side and deep dish 3 3/8 in. dia. screw on German silver reflector, nickel plated (This bicycle lamp is the subject of Frederic E. Baldwin’s noteworthy patent for an acetylene gas lamp filed on Oct. 18, 1899 and awarded on Aug. 28, 1900 as Patent No. 656,874. As noted in the patent claims, the lamp was especially designed for use as a bicycle or carriage lamp but also for general use. The lamp is historically significant in that the follow-on modification to this lamp known as the Full Moon became the first carbide lamp advertised and marketed for mining use. The history and photos of the Full Moon lamp are discussed elsewhere in the carbide hand lamp section of my website. An interesting description of the Baldwin Acetylene Bicycle Lamp is presented in the July 13, 1900 edition of the English Mechanic and World of Science No. 1842. The article as paraphrased in the following notes that a lamp which is noteworthy for its “cheapness, cleanliness, simplicity and efficiency” has been introduced by Mr. A. H. Funke of 101-103 Duane Street, Manhattan, New York City. The article goes on to describe the Baldwin lamp as termed by Mr. Funke as comprises a water tank in the upper part of the lamp and a carbide chamber secured to the base of the lamp by three clips. The carbide rests upon a removable tray provided with a central perforated tube about which a porous fabric is wrapped. A spring-pressed follower is employed to prevent the carbide from being jolted out of its chamber. The follower consists of two centrally perforated discs connected by a helical spring. Water is fed through to the central tube of the carbide tray by a small downwardly projecting duct provided with a valve, the stem of which is screwed to the top of the water tank. An index finger is provided to show whether the valve is open or closed. The filled tank with the valve open trickles water into the central tube of the tray, percolates through the porous fabric, and generates gas as it comes into contact with the carbide. The gas is filtered through cotton and fed to a burner located in the focus of a powerful parabolic reflector. By releasing the clips which hold the carbide chamber in place, the chamber can be removed without soiling the fingers. The burner pipe can be cleaned by unscrewing the reflector. The lamp weighs 11 oz., is only 6 in. high, and throws a brilliant white light for a distance of 50 ft. The lamp is made entirely of brass, well finished and nickel plated and is furnished with a German silver reflector which can easily be cleaned and will not become yellow.) Download Original Image
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