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Big Boy NP Bottom
Columbia Lamp Ad 1912 Mine and Smelter Supply Co.
Big Boy Brass Back
Columbia Mod C LSide
Columbia Mod C RSide
  Columbia Mod C Front.jpg - COLUMBIA MODEL C AUTOMATIC - Early gas carriage lamp modified to mining lamp, ca 1899-1916, marked on side COLUMBIA MODEL C AUTOMATIC and on other side HINE-WATT MFG. CO. CHICAGO USA, 7 ¾ in tall to handle, 3 ¼ in base dia, perfect glass lens and fish tail burner tip, green jewel on one side and red jewel on other side of lens housing, brass lamp body, see Thorpe, Carbide Light, p 233 for photo and advertising image of lamp [Among the earliest carbide lamps for use underground was the modified "Columbia Model C" acetylene bicycle lamp manufactured by the Hine-Watt Manufacturing Co. of Chicago, IL. The company was first listed in the Chicago City Directory in 1898.  Lucius A. Hine was president and Sern P. Watt was vice president.  Watt was granted at least 15 patents, three related to gas lamps and one to gas lamp burners.  The company was first located at 14-16 North Canal St. in Chicago. In 1915, the company’s address was changed to 180 North Market St. and it was listed as a supplier of auto parts.  By 1918, the company had ceased operations.  The first bicycle lamp manufactured by the company was called the Simplex lamp.  First advertised in 1899, the production lasted only about 18 months.  In 1899 the company introduced a second gas lamp called the Columbia Model C which proved to be quite popular.  Based on patent No. 662,842 awarded to Sern Watt on Nov. 27, 1900, the lamp was available in both nickel plate and gunmetal finish.  As shown here, this lamp was modified to include a larger diameter base and a bail handle across the top of the lamp for use as a lantern that could be used underground or for other applications.  A second modification is known without the bail but with oval handles and a hook on the back of the lamp.  Called the Pinkerton model, this lantern was advertised for watchmen, trainmen, meter readers, boiler inspectors, miners, hunters and campers.  The Columbia Model C was manufactured from 1899 to at least 1916.]  
Columbia Mod C Back
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Columbia Mod C Front | COLUMBIA MODEL C AUTOMATIC - Early gas carriage lamp modified to mining lamp, ca 1899-1916, marked on side COLUMBIA MODEL C AUTOMATIC and on other side HINE-WATT MFG. CO. CHICAGO USA, 7 ¾ in tall to handle, 3 ¼ in base dia, perfect glass lens and fish tail burner tip, green jewel on one side and red jewel on other side of lens housing, brass lamp body, see Thorpe, Carbide Light, p 233 for photo and advertising image of lamp [Among the earliest carbide lamps for use underground was the modified "Columbia Model C" acetylene bicycle lamp manufactured by the Hine-Watt Manufacturing Co. of Chicago, IL. The company was first listed in the Chicago City Directory in 1898. Lucius A. Hine was president and Sern P. Watt was vice president. Watt was granted at least 15 patents, three related to gas lamps and one to gas lamp burners. The company was first located at 14-16 North Canal St. in Chicago. In 1915, the company’s address was changed to 180 North Market St. and it was listed as a supplier of auto parts. By 1918, the company had ceased operations. The first bicycle lamp manufactured by the company was called the Simplex lamp. First advertised in 1899, the production lasted only about 18 months. In 1899 the company introduced a second gas lamp called the Columbia Model C which proved to be quite popular. Based on patent No. 662,842 awarded to Sern Watt on Nov. 27, 1900, the lamp was available in both nickel plate and gunmetal finish. As shown here, this lamp was modified to include a larger diameter base and a bail handle across the top of the lamp for use as a lantern that could be used underground or for other applications. A second modification is known without the bail but with oval handles and a hook on the back of the lamp. Called the Pinkerton model, this lantern was advertised for watchmen, trainmen, meter readers, boiler inspectors, miners, hunters and campers. The Columbia Model C was manufactured from 1899 to at least 1916.] Download Original Image
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