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ITP Flip Handle II Back
ITP Flip Handle II Bottom
ITP Trip Lamp Shown in John Simmons Ad in 1918 Mining Catalog
ITP Trip Lamp RSide
ITP Trip Lamp LSide
  ITP Trip Lamp Back LSide.JPG - ITP TRIP LAMP - Brass, steel and aluminum trip lamp, 6 7/8 in. high to top of water control knob, 2 3/4 in. brass bail, 3 1/4 in. base dia., marked on brass shoulder of base ITP LAMP DEWAR MFG. CO. BROOKLYN N.Y. U.S.A. PAT APRIL 2, 1912 JULY 29, 1913 AUG 6, 1916 JUNE 11, 1918 OTHERS PENDING, appears to be Dewar No. 200 lamp, used as a warning lamp on front or rear of a trip (train of mine cars) with a 5 in. dia. aluminum reflector painted with bright red enamel, the reflector is attached by a 1-in. steel band that is spot welded to the lamp body to allow the lamp to slide into the tongue of a separate bracket attached to the mine car, 9-hr burn time, all steel body with brass bail, water control, fill cap, and shoulder of base    (The Dewar Manufacturing Co. of Brooklyn, NY was the producer of the "ITP (It's Trouble Proof)" cap and hand lamps, the "Sun-Ray" cap lamps, and the "Dew-R-Lite" hand lamps. Dewar was formed around 1914 by Wilbur A. Cochrane, formerly with the John Simmons Co., Francis H. Coffin, formerly with the Scranton Acetylene Lamp Co., and John M. Brock, lamp designer and inventor. Dewar registered their ITP trademark in 1916 and was already producing its ITP cap and hand lamps. The ITP brand became linked with the term "Float Feed" which was Brock's 1916 patented device for an automatic water feed.  Dewar was also marketing a number of steel and nickel-plated ITP and Dewar hand lamps throughout the 1920s. In 1928, the all-brass Dew-R-Lite hand lamp models No. 204 with handles and No. 206 with bail were introduced by Dewar and sold throughout the 1930s. Prior to World War II, the Dewar Manufacturing Co. was purchased by the Wolf Safety Lamp Co. of America and Dewar carbide lamp production rapidly tapered off. See Clemmer, American Miner's Carbide Lamps, p 69 and Thorpe, Carbide Light, pp 49-57)  
ITP Trip Lamp Back RSide
ITP Trip Lamp Marking
ITP Trip Lamp Bottom
Justrite Ad 1921 Keystone Mining Catalogue
Jumbo LSide

ITP Trip Lamp Back LSide | ITP TRIP LAMP - Brass, steel and aluminum trip lamp, 6 7/8 in. high to top of water control knob, 2 3/4 in. brass bail, 3 1/4 in. base dia., marked on brass shoulder of base ITP LAMP DEWAR MFG. CO. BROOKLYN N.Y. U.S.A. PAT APRIL 2, 1912 JULY 29, 1913 AUG 6, 1916 JUNE 11, 1918 OTHERS PENDING, appears to be Dewar No. 200 lamp, used as a warning lamp on front or rear of a trip (train of mine cars) with a 5 in. dia. aluminum reflector painted with bright red enamel, the reflector is attached by a 1-in. steel band that is spot welded to the lamp body to allow the lamp to slide into the tongue of a separate bracket attached to the mine car, 9-hr burn time, all steel body with brass bail, water control, fill cap, and shoulder of base (The Dewar Manufacturing Co. of Brooklyn, NY was the producer of the "ITP (It's Trouble Proof)" cap and hand lamps, the "Sun-Ray" cap lamps, and the "Dew-R-Lite" hand lamps. Dewar was formed around 1914 by Wilbur A. Cochrane, formerly with the John Simmons Co., Francis H. Coffin, formerly with the Scranton Acetylene Lamp Co., and John M. Brock, lamp designer and inventor. Dewar registered their ITP trademark in 1916 and was already producing its ITP cap and hand lamps. The ITP brand became linked with the term "Float Feed" which was Brock's 1916 patented device for an automatic water feed. Dewar was also marketing a number of steel and nickel-plated ITP and Dewar hand lamps throughout the 1920s. In 1928, the all-brass Dew-R-Lite hand lamp models No. 204 with handles and No. 206 with bail were introduced by Dewar and sold throughout the 1930s. Prior to World War II, the Dewar Manufacturing Co. was purchased by the Wolf Safety Lamp Co. of America and Dewar carbide lamp production rapidly tapered off. See Clemmer, American Miner's Carbide Lamps, p 69 and Thorpe, Carbide Light, pp 49-57) Download Original Image
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