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Guy's Dropper Tall Boy LSide
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NP Guy's Dropper One-Date Tall Boy LSide
  NP Guy's Dropper One-Date Tall Boy Front.JPG - GUY'S DROPPER NP ONE-DATE TALL BOY - Rare nickel-plated one-date Guy’s Dropper tall boy superintendent lamp, with double ringed base and 2 1/4  in. bell-shaped windproof set screw reflector, 4 3/8 in. tall to top of water door, marked on top GUY’S DROPPER PAT. MAY 26-14 with ON and OFF, with hook and butterfly handles, ex-Dave Thorpe collection (One-date marked Guy’s Dropper cap lamps are all scarce.  This superintendent style tall boy lamp is the only one-date model of this style reportedly known.  The Shanklin Manufacturing Co. of Springfield, IL was a prominent producer of miner's carbide lamps with its famous "Guy's Dropper" carbide cap lamp.  Designed by Frank Guy, he obtained his first patent in 1910 (#974,054 of Oct. 25, 1910) and two additional patents (#1,097,716 of May 26, 1914 and #1,198,537 of Sept. 19, 1916) while developing a business arrangement with brothers George and Edgar Shanklin to manufacture the lamps.  In 1913, the brothers formed the Shanklin Manufacturing Co. to mass produce the Guy's Dropper lamp. The single-date Guy's Dropper lamps refer to the 1914 patent date. The two-date model refers to the 1914 and 1916 patent dates.   The war years of 1917-18 substantially increased the demand for carbide lamps as the need for coal and minerals peaked.  The Guy's Dropper benefited with this demand with increased production of both the cap and hand lamps.  As with other carbide lamp manufacturers, the 1920s brought a decline in the demand for acetylene lamps and problems for the Shanklin company.  In 1932, the Shanklin Manufacturing Co. was sold to the Universal Lamp Co. where the Guy's Dropper continued in production as a best-selling Universal product until the company ceased manufacturing carbide lamps in 1960.  See Clemmer, American Miner's Carbide Lamps, pp 85-88))   
NP Guy's Dropper One-Date Tall Boy RSide
NP Guy's Dropper One-Date Tall Boy Top
NP Guy's Dropper One-Date Tall Boy Back
NP Guy's Dropper One-Date Tall Boy Bottom
Shanklin No. 100 NP Tall Boy Guy's Dropper Supt . Lamp Advertised in 1921 Keystone Catalog

NP Guy's Dropper One-Date Tall Boy Front | GUY'S DROPPER NP ONE-DATE TALL BOY - Rare nickel-plated one-date Guy’s Dropper tall boy superintendent lamp, with double ringed base and 2 1/4 in. bell-shaped windproof set screw reflector, 4 3/8 in. tall to top of water door, marked on top GUY’S DROPPER PAT. MAY 26-14 with ON and OFF, with hook and butterfly handles, ex-Dave Thorpe collection (One-date marked Guy’s Dropper cap lamps are all scarce. This superintendent style tall boy lamp is the only one-date model of this style reportedly known. The Shanklin Manufacturing Co. of Springfield, IL was a prominent producer of miner's carbide lamps with its famous "Guy's Dropper" carbide cap lamp. Designed by Frank Guy, he obtained his first patent in 1910 (#974,054 of Oct. 25, 1910) and two additional patents (#1,097,716 of May 26, 1914 and #1,198,537 of Sept. 19, 1916) while developing a business arrangement with brothers George and Edgar Shanklin to manufacture the lamps. In 1913, the brothers formed the Shanklin Manufacturing Co. to mass produce the Guy's Dropper lamp. The single-date Guy's Dropper lamps refer to the 1914 patent date. The two-date model refers to the 1914 and 1916 patent dates. The war years of 1917-18 substantially increased the demand for carbide lamps as the need for coal and minerals peaked. The Guy's Dropper benefited with this demand with increased production of both the cap and hand lamps. As with other carbide lamp manufacturers, the 1920s brought a decline in the demand for acetylene lamps and problems for the Shanklin company. In 1932, the Shanklin Manufacturing Co. was sold to the Universal Lamp Co. where the Guy's Dropper continued in production as a best-selling Universal product until the company ceased manufacturing carbide lamps in 1960. See Clemmer, American Miner's Carbide Lamps, pp 85-88)) Download Original Image
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