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Kaba & Pelham Patent
  Kaba & Pelham LSide.JPG - KABA & PELHAM  PATENT - Rare folding hook and spike model candlestick; cast brass handle with sheet steel spring plate, hook and thimble assembly and square steel spike; 5 1/4 in. long folded and 8 1/2 in. long unfolded; stamped on the bottom of spring plate KABA & PELHAM COLO SPGS PAT. PEND [The rare Kaba and Pelham folding candlestick is another in a group of desirable Colorado patented candlesticks.  A total of 24 patents were awarded for Colorado miner’s candlesticks, the highest number by far of any state in the US.  Of those patents, at least one example is known for 16 of the patents.  The latest date Colorado patented stick is the Kaba and Pelham.  The patent application was filed by Charles P. Kaba and Harry D. Pelham, both of Colorado Springs, on Nov. 14, 1912.  The patent was awarded as No. 1,069,170 on Aug. 5, 1913.  Pelham’s share of the patent was assigned to Addie G. Slater, also of Colorado Springs.  The spring clip thimble, similar to the Curtiss patent, is different than that shown in the patent drawings.  Otherwise the stick follows the drawing, unlike so many patented sticks.  Around a half-dozen examples of the Kaba & Pelham candlestick are known in private collections.  This example is arguably the finest example known and was formerly in the collection of Dr. Dave Roter of Boulder, CO.  It is thought that the Kaba & Pelham folding sticks were primarily used in the Cripple Creek Mining District whose trade was supplied almost exclusively by Colorado Springs merchants.The candlestick is shown in association with a rich mineral specimen of sylvanite (silver gold telluride), calaverite (gold telluride) and gold on granite from the historic Cresson Mine in the Cripple Creek District.  The gold ores of the Cripple Creek District were primarily tellurides.  The Cresson Vug was one of two vug discoveries at the Cresson Mine - the first being in 1903 on the 600' workings (relatively unspectacular) and the second being a fabulous vug discovered on November 24, 1914 by miners working on the 1200' level whom had the luck of breaking into a vug 40 feet high by 20 feet long and 15 feet wide. The walls were covered with sylvanite and calaverite crystals with thousands of flakes of pure oxidized gold and bronze colored calaverite crystals the size of thumbnails lining the entire vug. It’s estimated that 20,000 ounces of gold were removed over the first few days and over 60,000 ounces of gold in about four weeks - nearly $100 million in today’s values. The Cresson Mine was reopened in 1994 by the Cripple Creek and Victor Gold Mining Co as a low-grade, heap-leach surface mining operation. It is now Colorado's largest gold producing mine.]  
Kaba & Pelham RSide
Kaba & Pelham Folded Side
Kaba & Pelham Folded Bottom Marking
Kaba & Pelham Folded Top
Kaba & Pelham Unfolded Top

Kaba & Pelham LSide | KABA & PELHAM PATENT - Rare folding hook and spike model candlestick; cast brass handle with sheet steel spring plate, hook and thimble assembly and square steel spike; 5 1/4 in. long folded and 8 1/2 in. long unfolded; stamped on the bottom of spring plate KABA & PELHAM COLO SPGS PAT. PEND [The rare Kaba and Pelham folding candlestick is another in a group of desirable Colorado patented candlesticks. A total of 24 patents were awarded for Colorado miner’s candlesticks, the highest number by far of any state in the US. Of those patents, at least one example is known for 16 of the patents. The latest date Colorado patented stick is the Kaba and Pelham. The patent application was filed by Charles P. Kaba and Harry D. Pelham, both of Colorado Springs, on Nov. 14, 1912. The patent was awarded as No. 1,069,170 on Aug. 5, 1913. Pelham’s share of the patent was assigned to Addie G. Slater, also of Colorado Springs. The spring clip thimble, similar to the Curtiss patent, is different than that shown in the patent drawings. Otherwise the stick follows the drawing, unlike so many patented sticks. Around a half-dozen examples of the Kaba & Pelham candlestick are known in private collections. This example is arguably the finest example known and was formerly in the collection of Dr. Dave Roter of Boulder, CO. It is thought that the Kaba & Pelham folding sticks were primarily used in the Cripple Creek Mining District whose trade was supplied almost exclusively by Colorado Springs merchants. The candlestick is shown in association with a rich mineral specimen of sylvanite (silver gold telluride), calaverite (gold telluride) and gold on granite from the historic Cresson Mine in the Cripple Creek District. The gold ores of the Cripple Creek District were primarily tellurides. The Cresson Vug was one of two vug discoveries at the Cresson Mine - the first being in 1903 on the 600' workings (relatively unspectacular) and the second being a fabulous vug discovered on November 24, 1914 by miners working on the 1200' level whom had the luck of breaking into a vug 40 feet high by 20 feet long and 15 feet wide. The walls were covered with sylvanite and calaverite crystals with thousands of flakes of pure oxidized gold and bronze colored calaverite crystals the size of thumbnails lining the entire vug. It’s estimated that 20,000 ounces of gold were removed over the first few days and over 60,000 ounces of gold in about four weeks - nearly $100 million in today’s values. The Cresson Mine was reopened in 1994 by the Cripple Creek and Victor Gold Mining Co as a low-grade, heap-leach surface mining operation. It is now Colorado's largest gold producing mine.] Download Original Image
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