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Colorado and Pikes Peak Consolidated Mining Cripple Creek
Colorado Bureau of Mines Bell Sign
Cupel Mould
Cupel Mould II
Cupel Mould Ad 1899 John Taylor & Co Catalogue
  3 and 4 in Davis Anemometers.JPG - 3 AND 4 IN. DAVIS ANEMOMETERS - Biram anemometers were typically offered in 3, 4 and 6 in. dia. options although custom sizes were also available.  The two pictured here were both built by the Davis Instrument Co. of Baltimore, MD.  The actual diameters for the one on the left is 3 1/4 in and 4 1/4 for the one on the right.  Although several manufacturers made anemometers, the Biram anemometers all share a similar configuration and operation.  As noted in the 1912 Mine and Smelter Supply Company Catalog No. 24, "portable airmeters (the vane assembly is at a right angle to the dial) and Biram anemometers (as shown here) are for the measurement of air currents in mines, tunnels, etc.  The indications are obtained by the means of a delicately poised fan-wheel, the recordings being commenced by the long or central hand, which traverses the outer circumference of the main dial, showing the passage of 100 feet of air in a complete revolution.  The usual way of taking a test is to place the instrument in the current in a number of different positions; take the number of feet that have passed during a certain time, for instance, say one minute; then divide the total by the number of readings and obtain the average; multiply that by the square of the opening or channel, and the result is the velocity of air, in feet, passing in a given time."  
3 in Davis Anemometer Front
3 in Davis Anemometer Back
4 in Davis Anemometer
Du Pont Tamping Bag
Dupont Letter Openers Front

3 and 4 in Davis Anemometers | 3 AND 4 IN. DAVIS ANEMOMETERS - Biram anemometers were typically offered in 3, 4 and 6 in. dia. options although custom sizes were also available. The two pictured here were both built by the Davis Instrument Co. of Baltimore, MD. The actual diameters for the one on the left is 3 1/4 in and 4 1/4 for the one on the right. Although several manufacturers made anemometers, the Biram anemometers all share a similar configuration and operation. As noted in the 1912 Mine and Smelter Supply Company Catalog No. 24, "portable airmeters (the vane assembly is at a right angle to the dial) and Biram anemometers (as shown here) are for the measurement of air currents in mines, tunnels, etc. The indications are obtained by the means of a delicately poised fan-wheel, the recordings being commenced by the long or central hand, which traverses the outer circumference of the main dial, showing the passage of 100 feet of air in a complete revolution. The usual way of taking a test is to place the instrument in the current in a number of different positions; take the number of feet that have passed during a certain time, for instance, say one minute; then divide the total by the number of readings and obtain the average; multiply that by the square of the opening or channel, and the result is the velocity of air, in feet, passing in a given time." Download Original Image
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