Up Miscellaneous Mining Items Prev Next Slideshow

 Previous image  Next image  Index page  Original Image [Coal and Iron Police Badge Back.JPG - 371kB]
Card Ore Car Swivelled
Card Ore Car Wheel
Card Ore Car Marking
Catalpa Mining Co Leadville
Coal and Iron Police Badge Front
  Coal and Iron Police Badge Back.JPG - COAL & IRON POLICE BADGE DL&W RR - Coal and iron police badge number 25 for the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Co. in Pennsylvania, marked on badge D.L.&W.C.&I., POLICE PA. and number 25, functional pin on back, badge and pin nonferrous and thought to be nickel silver, 2 7/8 in. tall by 1 3/4 in. wide, ex-Dale Richards collection  [COAL & IRON POLICE - In 1865, the Pennsylvania State Legislature passed State Act 228 which empowered the railroads to organize private police forces. In 1866, a supplement to the act was passed extending the privilege to "embrace all corporations, firms, or individuals, owning, leasing, or being in possession of any colliery, furnace, or rolling mill within this commonwealth." The men of the private police forces were called "Coal and Iron Police" and received commissions from the state although their salaries were paid by the various coal companies for whom they worked. Although they were hired to protect the property of their respective coal companies and the homes of coal company officials, they were used to intimidate and break up striking mine workers, and if necessary, evict them and their families from their homes. In some communities the coal and iron police were accused of assault, kidnapping, rape, and murder. A total of over 7,632 commissions were given for the Coal and Iron Police.  On June 30, 1931, Pennsylvania Governor Pinchot revoked all coal and iron police commissions, thus ending a 66-year period of sad mining history in the state of Pennsylvania.DELAWARE, LACKAWANNA & WESTERN RAILROAD - The Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad was one of the largest and most prosperous anthracite mining and transporting companies in Pennsylvania. The Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Company was incorporated in Pennsylvania on April 7, 1832, as the Liggetts Gap Railroad Company. Its name was changed to the Lackawanna & Western Railroad Company on April 14, 1851, and to the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western (DL&W) Railroad Company on March 11, 1853, at which time it absorbed the Delaware & Cobbs Gap Railroad Company. The first section of railroad, from Scranton to Great Bend in Pennsylvania, opened in October 1851. The Southern Division of the railroad was opened between Scranton and the Delaware River on May 27, 1856, forming a more direct route to New York City in connection with the Warren Railroad and the Central Railroad of New Jersey. The DL&W leased the Morris & Essex Railroad in 1868 and, after upgrading it to permit a heavy coal tonnage, secured its own line to New York Harbor. Other extensions carried the Lackawanna to Utica, Syracuse, Ithaca, and Oswego in central New York State and to Buffalo in the early 1880s. The DL&W had a particular advantage in that it was allowed to directly operate coal mines. The DL&W began mining on its own account in 1851, when a Coal Department was organized. The Lackawanna was exceptionally well placed to supply both New York City and New England via the Southern Division and also upstate New York, the Great Lakes, and Canada via the Northern Division. In conformity with the commodity clause of the Hepburn Act, railroad companies could not legally transport in interstate commerce coal owned by them.  The coal sales department of the DL&W RR Co.  was discontinued voluntarily August 1, 1909 and a coal selling company was organized under the title of the DL&W Coal Co. under the laws of the state of NJ. However, in a further suit brought against the DL&W RR Co. by the U.S. government for violations of the Sherman Antitrust Act, the U.S. Supreme Court handed down a decision on June 21, 1915 that the company’s relationship with the Coal Co. was a monopoly and that it be dissolved. By 1915, the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad Company's Coal Co. was operating twenty-three large collieries, each producing nearly a half-million tons annually, in the anthracite mining areas in Lackawanna and Luzerne Counties of eastern Pennsylvania. Company breakers operating in 1915 included the Archibald, Bliss, Brisbin, Continental, Diamond, Hampton, Holden, Loomis, Pyne, Sloan, Taylor, Truesdale, and Woodward.  At the time, lands controlled by the DL&W Railroad were estimated to contain 400 million tons of unmined anthracite coal. A new independent Coal Co. was formed and contracted by the DL&W RR Co. in 1915 to comply with the Supreme Court ruling.  This new Coal Co. ultimately became the Glen Alden Coal Co. in 1921.After World War II the DL&W hoped to merge with its principal western connection, the Nickle Plate, but was unsuccessful. After continuing losses from commuter service and heavy storm damage to its main lines in 1955, the company began to explore the possibility of consolidation with the roughly parallel Erie Railroad. The merger, forming the Erie Lackawanna Railroad Company, took effect on October 17, 1960.]  
Woodward_Breaker_1900
L&WB Badge Front
L&WB Badge Back
Maxwell Breaker L and WB Coal Co 1910
Colorado and Pikes Peak Consolidated Mining Cripple Creek

Coal and Iron Police Badge Back | COAL & IRON POLICE BADGE DL&W RR - Coal and iron police badge number 25 for the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Co. in Pennsylvania, marked on badge D.L.&W.C.&I., POLICE PA. and number 25, functional pin on back, badge and pin nonferrous and thought to be nickel silver, 2 7/8 in. tall by 1 3/4 in. wide, ex-Dale Richards collection [COAL & IRON POLICE - In 1865, the Pennsylvania State Legislature passed State Act 228 which empowered the railroads to organize private police forces. In 1866, a supplement to the act was passed extending the privilege to "embrace all corporations, firms, or individuals, owning, leasing, or being in possession of any colliery, furnace, or rolling mill within this commonwealth." The men of the private police forces were called "Coal and Iron Police" and received commissions from the state although their salaries were paid by the various coal companies for whom they worked. Although they were hired to protect the property of their respective coal companies and the homes of coal company officials, they were used to intimidate and break up striking mine workers, and if necessary, evict them and their families from their homes. In some communities the coal and iron police were accused of assault, kidnapping, rape, and murder. A total of over 7,632 commissions were given for the Coal and Iron Police. On June 30, 1931, Pennsylvania Governor Pinchot revoked all coal and iron police commissions, thus ending a 66-year period of sad mining history in the state of Pennsylvania. DELAWARE, LACKAWANNA & WESTERN RAILROAD - The Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad was one of the largest and most prosperous anthracite mining and transporting companies in Pennsylvania. The Delaware, Lackawanna & Western Railroad Company was incorporated in Pennsylvania on April 7, 1832, as the Liggetts Gap Railroad Company. Its name was changed to the Lackawanna & Western Railroad Company on April 14, 1851, and to the Delaware, Lackawanna & Western (DL&W) Railroad Company on March 11, 1853, at which time it absorbed the Delaware & Cobbs Gap Railroad Company. The first section of railroad, from Scranton to Great Bend in Pennsylvania, opened in October 1851. The Southern Division of the railroad was opened between Scranton and the Delaware River on May 27, 1856, forming a more direct route to New York City in connection with the Warren Railroad and the Central Railroad of New Jersey. The DL&W leased the Morris & Essex Railroad in 1868 and, after upgrading it to permit a heavy coal tonnage, secured its own line to New York Harbor. Other extensions carried the Lackawanna to Utica, Syracuse, Ithaca, and Oswego in central New York State and to Buffalo in the early 1880s. The DL&W had a particular advantage in that it was allowed to directly operate coal mines. The DL&W began mining on its own account in 1851, when a Coal Department was organized. The Lackawanna was exceptionally well placed to supply both New York City and New England via the Southern Division and also upstate New York, the Great Lakes, and Canada via the Northern Division. In conformity with the commodity clause of the Hepburn Act, railroad companies could not legally transport in interstate commerce coal owned by them. The coal sales department of the DL&W RR Co. was discontinued voluntarily August 1, 1909 and a coal selling company was organized under the title of the DL&W Coal Co. under the laws of the state of NJ. However, in a further suit brought against the DL&W RR Co. by the U.S. government for violations of the Sherman Antitrust Act, the U.S. Supreme Court handed down a decision on June 21, 1915 that the company’s relationship with the Coal Co. was a monopoly and that it be dissolved. By 1915, the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Railroad Company's Coal Co. was operating twenty-three large collieries, each producing nearly a half-million tons annually, in the anthracite mining areas in Lackawanna and Luzerne Counties of eastern Pennsylvania. Company breakers operating in 1915 included the Archibald, Bliss, Brisbin, Continental, Diamond, Hampton, Holden, Loomis, Pyne, Sloan, Taylor, Truesdale, and Woodward. At the time, lands controlled by the DL&W Railroad were estimated to contain 400 million tons of unmined anthracite coal. A new independent Coal Co. was formed and contracted by the DL&W RR Co. in 1915 to comply with the Supreme Court ruling. This new Coal Co. ultimately became the Glen Alden Coal Co. in 1921. After World War II the DL&W hoped to merge with its principal western connection, the Nickle Plate, but was unsuccessful. After continuing losses from commuter service and heavy storm damage to its main lines in 1955, the company began to explore the possibility of consolidation with the roughly parallel Erie Railroad. The merger, forming the Erie Lackawanna Railroad Company, took effect on October 17, 1960.] Download Original Image
Total images: 226 | Last update: 10/31/17 4:34 PM | Help