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Hicks Portable Air Meter Back
Hicks Portable Air Meter in Box
Hicks Catalogue ca 1870
Hicks Air Meter Offered in 1870s James J. Hicks Catalogue
John Hendy Ad May 1902 Engineering and Mining Journal
  Hendy Matteson Car Brass Tag.JPG - JOSHUA HENDY MATTESON CAR TAG - Original brass ore care tag embossed IMPROVED MATTESON CAR, PAT. JULY-23-1907 AUG-17-1907, OTHER PAT. PENDING, SIZE NO E 55, MANUFACTURED BY JOSHUA HENDY IRON WORKS, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. U.S.A. 6 in. long, 3 1/8 in. high in oval shape  (Born in Cornwall, England in 1822, Joshua Hendy came to the United States in 1836. He learned the machinist’s trade and in 1849 he traveled to California. He found work as a mechanic in the newly constructed boiler shops of San Francisco. In 1856 he started the Joshua Hendy Machine Works at 49-51 Fremont St. in San Francisco.  By the 1860’s he was repairing milling and mining equipment and built a foundry to cast component parts for various types of machinery.  Because the hard rock mines of California were booming, most of his repair work was done on mining equipment, especially the stamp mills used for crushing ore.  In 1874 he invented, patented and started producing the Challenge Automatic Ore Feeder for stamp mills.  This feeder, which ran off the main shaft of the mill automatically opened and closed the hopper to feed a continuous and consistent amount of ore to the stamp heads, thus maximizing production and minimizing damage.  From 1880 to 1885 he patented several improvements, bought out many other patents and soon controlled the ore feeder market. The Joshua Hendy Machine Works built feeders under its own name, and built the feeders for almost all other mill manufacturers. In 1882 he incorporated the business with his nephew Samuel J. Hendy as president of the firm.  During the 1880’s the company built ore concentrators, elevators, crushers, and hydraulic monitors.  By 1888 Samuel's brother John became plant superintendent, and the Machine Works was building stamp mills, crushers, ore cars, hoists, buckets, skips, steam engines, pumps and many other types of mining equipment used all over the west.  On October 19, 1891 Joshua Hendy died at the age of 74. Samuel Hendy took over the business, and expanded production in casting, forging and riveting iron. The Machine Works continued to expand its manufacturing, producing ever larger and more modern mining equipment.  In 1906 major changes occurred. Samuel died in the spring of that year, so his brother John took over the day to day running of the business. When the great San Francisco earthquake and fire hit in April, everything in the manufacturing area of the city was destroyed. The Iron Works had already outgrown its facilities on Fremont St, so John decided that since he had to rebuild from scratch, he would keep the offices there, but moved the company’s manufacturing to a large tract of land south of San Francisco at Murphy’s Station near Sunnyvale, where he could expand the plant even more. It is most likely that at this time the name of the business was changed to the Joshua Hendy Iron Works. In Sunnyvale, the business had room to grow, and continued on strongly through the years, even during the depression of the 1930’s.  When WWII hit, and the mines were shut down by government decree, the Iron Works built ship components and ship engines for the war effort.  After the war, the mining industry was finally starting to wane, so the Iron Works continued by building marine engines.  In 1947 the Joshua Hendy Iron Works was sold to Westinghouse Corp., who continued to use it for a manufacturing plant.  In 1996, Westinghouse sold the plant to Northrop Grumman, which renamed it Northrop Grumman Marine Systems and still has a facility there in Sunnyvale to this day.The Joshua Hendy Iron Works was producing the patented Matteson ore car at the newly constructed plant in Sunnyvale after 1907.  Walter Carlos Matteson was born in Stockton, CA on March 22, 1856.  He learned his father’s blacksmith trade, working for his father for eight years.  He later started a carriage and plow shop which burned down in 1885 after which he became a foreman at the Shaw Plow Works in Stockton.  He married Mary Eggleston in 1876 and had two children.  Walter Matteson would go on to become a prolific inventor with several patents to his name including three specifically for ore cars.  His first ore car patent No. 713,321 was filed on May 20, 1902 and was awarded on Nov. 11, 1902 for an improved door locking mechanism that is either locked or released as the car is tilted.  His second and third ore car patents are noted on the pictured car tag.  Patent No. 860,817 was awarded on July 23, 1907 for a compound dumping hinge and automatic door bar.  Patent No. 864,321 was awarded on Aug. 27, 1907 for improvements to the car axle to minimize wear on the bearings.  Interestingly, the patent date of Aug. 17, 1907 shown on the car tag is incorrect being 10 days earlier than the award date.)  
Matteson Patent I
Matteson Patent II
Matteson Patent III
Justrite Pay Envelope Front
Justrite Pay Envelope Back

Hendy Matteson Car Brass Tag | JOSHUA HENDY MATTESON CAR TAG - Original brass ore care tag embossed IMPROVED MATTESON CAR, PAT. JULY-23-1907 AUG-17-1907, OTHER PAT. PENDING, SIZE NO E 55, MANUFACTURED BY JOSHUA HENDY IRON WORKS, SAN FRANCISCO, CAL. U.S.A. 6 in. long, 3 1/8 in. high in oval shape (Born in Cornwall, England in 1822, Joshua Hendy came to the United States in 1836. He learned the machinist’s trade and in 1849 he traveled to California. He found work as a mechanic in the newly constructed boiler shops of San Francisco. In 1856 he started the Joshua Hendy Machine Works at 49-51 Fremont St. in San Francisco. By the 1860’s he was repairing milling and mining equipment and built a foundry to cast component parts for various types of machinery. Because the hard rock mines of California were booming, most of his repair work was done on mining equipment, especially the stamp mills used for crushing ore. In 1874 he invented, patented and started producing the Challenge Automatic Ore Feeder for stamp mills. This feeder, which ran off the main shaft of the mill automatically opened and closed the hopper to feed a continuous and consistent amount of ore to the stamp heads, thus maximizing production and minimizing damage. From 1880 to 1885 he patented several improvements, bought out many other patents and soon controlled the ore feeder market. The Joshua Hendy Machine Works built feeders under its own name, and built the feeders for almost all other mill manufacturers. In 1882 he incorporated the business with his nephew Samuel J. Hendy as president of the firm. During the 1880’s the company built ore concentrators, elevators, crushers, and hydraulic monitors. By 1888 Samuel's brother John became plant superintendent, and the Machine Works was building stamp mills, crushers, ore cars, hoists, buckets, skips, steam engines, pumps and many other types of mining equipment used all over the west. On October 19, 1891 Joshua Hendy died at the age of 74. Samuel Hendy took over the business, and expanded production in casting, forging and riveting iron. The Machine Works continued to expand its manufacturing, producing ever larger and more modern mining equipment. In 1906 major changes occurred. Samuel died in the spring of that year, so his brother John took over the day to day running of the business. When the great San Francisco earthquake and fire hit in April, everything in the manufacturing area of the city was destroyed. The Iron Works had already outgrown its facilities on Fremont St, so John decided that since he had to rebuild from scratch, he would keep the offices there, but moved the company’s manufacturing to a large tract of land south of San Francisco at Murphy’s Station near Sunnyvale, where he could expand the plant even more. It is most likely that at this time the name of the business was changed to the Joshua Hendy Iron Works. In Sunnyvale, the business had room to grow, and continued on strongly through the years, even during the depression of the 1930’s. When WWII hit, and the mines were shut down by government decree, the Iron Works built ship components and ship engines for the war effort. After the war, the mining industry was finally starting to wane, so the Iron Works continued by building marine engines. In 1947 the Joshua Hendy Iron Works was sold to Westinghouse Corp., who continued to use it for a manufacturing plant. In 1996, Westinghouse sold the plant to Northrop Grumman, which renamed it Northrop Grumman Marine Systems and still has a facility there in Sunnyvale to this day. The Joshua Hendy Iron Works was producing the patented Matteson ore car at the newly constructed plant in Sunnyvale after 1907. Walter Carlos Matteson was born in Stockton, CA on March 22, 1856. He learned his father’s blacksmith trade, working for his father for eight years. He later started a carriage and plow shop which burned down in 1885 after which he became a foreman at the Shaw Plow Works in Stockton. He married Mary Eggleston in 1876 and had two children. Walter Matteson would go on to become a prolific inventor with several patents to his name including three specifically for ore cars. His first ore car patent No. 713,321 was filed on May 20, 1902 and was awarded on Nov. 11, 1902 for an improved door locking mechanism that is either locked or released as the car is tilted. His second and third ore car patents are noted on the pictured car tag. Patent No. 860,817 was awarded on July 23, 1907 for a compound dumping hinge and automatic door bar. Patent No. 864,321 was awarded on Aug. 27, 1907 for improvements to the car axle to minimize wear on the bearings. Interestingly, the patent date of Aug. 17, 1907 shown on the car tag is incorrect being 10 days earlier than the award date.) Download Original Image
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