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Hardsocg Miners Canteen Marking
Hardsocg Miners Canteen Top
Hendrie & Bolthoff Ad from the July 26, 1907 Edition of Mines and Mining
Hendrie & Bolthoff Ore Car Tag
Hercules Match Safe Front
  Hercules Match Safe Back.JPG - HERCULES POWDER MATCH SAFE - Hercules Powder celluloid advertising match safe, marked HERCULES POWDER on front with company symbol and 5 boxes of explosives and one cap tin onback, B. CARROLL CHICAGO on one edge and HERCULES POWDER CO. PITTSBURGH, PA. on other edge, brass top and bottom with match striker, 2 5/8 in. tall x 1 1/2 in. wide x 3/8 in. thick  (During their hundred year history (1840-1940) match safes were constructed in every conceivable material and combination of materials.  They were ingeniously made in a spectacular variety of shapes. The match safe’s vital and central purpose, however, has remained the same; the provision of a secure container for strike-anywhere friction matches together with a striking surface.  The first container for friction matches appeared some time after their invention in the 1830’s and commercial availability in stores soon thereafter.  The exact date of invention is disputed but it is generally agreed that the inventor was an English chemist who was so indifferent to his invention that he failed to patent it.  Friction matches caught on rapidly and were manufactured for the general public all over Europe and North America.  The match was an important technical advance in its time.  Friction matches contained phosphorus and were hazardous (they could explode in one’s pocket) so they required protection in a fire-proof container that could be easily carried.  Early on many of these little cases became jewelry-like and masterfully made though the majority remained utilitarian and commercial such as the celluloid advertising safe shown here.  The finest match safes were made from gold or silver in designs characteristic of the period.  When new lighting devices were invented, the match safe did not immediately disappear but went through certain alterations first.  Safety matches (matches whose heads would not ignite without coming in contact with chemicals embedded in a roughened striker strip) had been around for years but became more popular when books of safety matches were introduced.   Liquid fuel lighters became popular around World War I and soon displaced matches to some extent and the match safe altogether.  The last traditional match safes were made in the 1930’s and their use ceased prior to World War II.  See Karl Koenig, "Pocket Match Safes," Silver Magazine, March/April 2000)  
Hercules Match Safe Side
Hercules Powder Company Trade Mark
Hercules Miner's Best Friend Match Safe Front
Hercules Miner's Best Friend Match Safe Back
Hercules Miner's Best Friend Match Safe Side

Hercules Match Safe Back | HERCULES POWDER MATCH SAFE - Hercules Powder celluloid advertising match safe, marked HERCULES POWDER on front with company symbol and 5 boxes of explosives and one cap tin on back, B. CARROLL CHICAGO on one edge and HERCULES POWDER CO. PITTSBURGH, PA. on other edge, brass top and bottom with match striker, 2 5/8 in. tall x 1 1/2 in. wide x 3/8 in. thick (During their hundred year history (1840-1940) match safes were constructed in every conceivable material and combination of materials. They were ingeniously made in a spectacular variety of shapes. The match safe’s vital and central purpose, however, has remained the same; the provision of a secure container for strike-anywhere friction matches together with a striking surface. The first container for friction matches appeared some time after their invention in the 1830’s and commercial availability in stores soon thereafter. The exact date of invention is disputed but it is generally agreed that the inventor was an English chemist who was so indifferent to his invention that he failed to patent it. Friction matches caught on rapidly and were manufactured for the general public all over Europe and North America. The match was an important technical advance in its time. Friction matches contained phosphorus and were hazardous (they could explode in one’s pocket) so they required protection in a fire-proof container that could be easily carried. Early on many of these little cases became jewelry-like and masterfully made though the majority remained utilitarian and commercial such as the celluloid advertising safe shown here. The finest match safes were made from gold or silver in designs characteristic of the period. When new lighting devices were invented, the match safe did not immediately disappear but went through certain alterations first. Safety matches (matches whose heads would not ignite without coming in contact with chemicals embedded in a roughened striker strip) had been around for years but became more popular when books of safety matches were introduced. Liquid fuel lighters became popular around World War I and soon displaced matches to some extent and the match safe altogether. The last traditional match safes were made in the 1930’s and their use ceased prior to World War II. See Karl Koenig, "Pocket Match Safes," Silver Magazine, March/April 2000) Download Original Image
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