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Hercules Powder Company Trade Mark
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Hicks Portable Air Meter Side
  Hicks Portable Air Meter Top.JPG - HICKS PORTABLE AIR METER - Rare brass anemometer made by J. J. Hicks, London, England, ca. 1870s, large dial plus 5 smaller dials recording hundred, thousand, ten thousand, hundred thousand, and ten million feet;  dial markedAIRMETER No. 827, fan housing marked J. J. HICKS 8,9&10 HATTON GARDEN LONDON, 2 3/4 in. wide by 3 in. deep and 3 1/4 in. high; with box, mount and correction label  [James J. Hicks of London, England was a well-known manufacturer of scientific instruments in the latter half of the 19th century.  Born in 1837, James Joseph Hicks apprenticed as an instrument maker with L. P. Casella in London starting in 1852.  By 1860 he had risen to a position of foreman with the company.  This date also marks the start of Hicks’ many patent filings principally relating to meteorological and clinical thermometers.  In 1861 Hicks started his own company at 8 Hatton Garden, manufacturing a variety of scientific and medical appliances.  He married Emma Sarah Robertson, a milliner, in 1862 with whom he had a son and two daughters.  By the 1870s, James J. Hicks’ manufactory was perhaps the most important supplier of barometers and thermometers in London at the time.  He became the first major manufacturer of clinical thermometers and thermometers applied to meteorology and brewing.  His company expanded to occupy 8, 9 and 10 Hatton Garden by 1878 catering to the developing science of meteorology, the growing use of industrial control instruments and to military needs through the manufacture of thermometers, barometers, pressure gauges, anemometers and many other types of apparatus.  In 1911 Hicks’ company was sold to W. F. Stanley & Co., Ltd in London.  By the end of his working life, he claimed to have manufactured 13 million clinical thermometers, which he supplied throughout the empire.  Hicks died in 1916.  Hicks’ instruments continue to be sought after for their quality and workmanship.]  
Hicks Portable Air Meter Back
Hicks Portable Air Meter in Box
Hicks Catalogue ca 1870
Hicks Air Meter Offered in 1870s James J. Hicks Catalogue
John Hendy Ad May 1902 Engineering and Mining Journal

Hicks Portable Air Meter Top | HICKS PORTABLE AIR METER - Rare brass anemometer made by J. J. Hicks, London, England, ca. 1870s, large dial plus 5 smaller dials recording hundred, thousand, ten thousand, hundred thousand, and ten million feet; dial marked AIRMETER No. 827, fan housing marked J. J. HICKS 8,9&10 HATTON GARDEN LONDON, 2 3/4 in. wide by 3 in. deep and 3 1/4 in. high; with box, mount and correction label [James J. Hicks of London, England was a well-known manufacturer of scientific instruments in the latter half of the 19th century. Born in 1837, James Joseph Hicks apprenticed as an instrument maker with L. P. Casella in London starting in 1852. By 1860 he had risen to a position of foreman with the company. This date also marks the start of Hicks’ many patent filings principally relating to meteorological and clinical thermometers. In 1861 Hicks started his own company at 8 Hatton Garden, manufacturing a variety of scientific and medical appliances. He married Emma Sarah Robertson, a milliner, in 1862 with whom he had a son and two daughters. By the 1870s, James J. Hicks’ manufactory was perhaps the most important supplier of barometers and thermometers in London at the time. He became the first major manufacturer of clinical thermometers and thermometers applied to meteorology and brewing. His company expanded to occupy 8, 9 and 10 Hatton Garden by 1878 catering to the developing science of meteorology, the growing use of industrial control instruments and to military needs through the manufacture of thermometers, barometers, pressure gauges, anemometers and many other types of apparatus. In 1911 Hicks’ company was sold to W. F. Stanley & Co., Ltd in London. By the end of his working life, he claimed to have manufactured 13 million clinical thermometers, which he supplied throughout the empire. Hicks died in 1916. Hicks’ instruments continue to be sought after for their quality and workmanship.] Download Original Image
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