Up Miscellaneous Mining Items Prev Next Slideshow

 Previous image  Next image  Index page  Original Image [L&WB Badge Front.JPG - 1.2MB]
Card Ore Car Marking
Catalpa Mining Co Leadville
Coal and Iron Police Badge Front
Coal and Iron Police Badge Back
Woodward_Breaker_1900
  L&WB Badge Front.JPG - COAL & IRON POLICE BADGE L&WB COAL - Roundish coal and iron police badge with eagle on top, 2 in. tall by 1 9/16 in. wide, Lehigh & Wilkes-Barre Coal Company’s private police force, part of the industrial police forces known as Coal & Iron Police which were legal in Pennsylvania from 1865 to 1931. Lehigh & Wilkes-Barre Coal Company operated coal mines in the Northern Anthracite Field (Luzerne and Lackawanna Counties). Badge dates from prior to 1929, at which time L&WB was purchased by Glen Alden Coal CompanyCOAL & IRON POLICE - In 1865, the Pennsylvania State Legislature passed State Act 228 which empowered the railroads to organize private police forces. In 1866, a supplement to the act was passed extending the privilege to "embrace all corporations, firms, or individuals, owning, leasing, or being in possession of any colliery, furnace, or rolling mill within this commonwealth." The men of the private police forces were called "Coal and Iron Police" and received commissions from the state although their salaries were paid by the various coal companies for whom they worked. Although they were hired to protect the property of their respective coal companies and the homes of coal company officials, they were used to intimidate and break up striking mine workers, and if necessary, evict them and their families from their homes. In some communities the coal and iron police were accused of assault, kidnapping, rape, and murder. A total of over 7,632 commissions were given for the Coal and Iron Police.  On June 30, 1931, Governor Pinchot revoked all coal and iron police commissions, thus ending a 66-year period of sad mining history in the state of Pennsylvania.LEHIGH AND WILKES-BARRE COAL COMPANY – The Lehigh and Wilkes-Barre Coal Company was one of six companies that dominated coal production in the Northern Anthracite Field of Pennsylvania during the later nineteenth century and early twentieth century.  The Northern Field, with an area of about 176 square miles, extended through the Lackawanna-Wyoming Valley from Forest City to Shickshinny in a canoe-shaped arc. The coal beds lie in near horizontal layers, gently sloping up the sides of the valley where they are exposed in outcrops running along the flanks. The field is about 55 miles long and has a maximum width of about six miles. Vertical shafts in this field have depths ranging from a few hundred feet to almost 1500 feet at the deepest points in the southern end near Nanticoke. The principal towns in the field are Forrest City, Carbondale, Scranton, Pittston, Wilkes-Barre, Plymouth, Nanticoke and Shickshinny. Other mining companies that conducted major operations here included the Hudson Coal Co.; Lehigh Valley Coal Co.; the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Coal Mining Co.; the Pennsylvania Coal Co.; and the Susquehanna Coal Co.The Lehigh and Wilkes-Barre Coal Company was formed by the consolidation of Wilkes-Barre Coal and Iron Company and Honey Brook Coal Company on Feb. 6, 1874.  The organization with J. Rogers Maxwell as president was conducted under the charter of the Broad Top Mining Company dated June 1871.  The company was controlled by the Central Railroad Company of New Jersey which at the time owned nearly all the company stock and bonds.  As of 1894, the L&WB Coal Company controlled over 40,000 acres of valuable coal lands in the Wyoming Valley, much of it undeveloped, and operated 11 collieries in the Wilkes-Barre District as the largest coal producer in that district.  These collieries included the Hollenback, Empire, South Wilkes-Barre, Stanton, Jersey, Sugar Notch, Lance, Nottingham, Reynolds, Wanamie, and Maxwell. The L&WB Coal Company was purchased by the Glen Alden Coal Company for $86 million on Dec. 31. 1929.  
L&WB Badge Back
Maxwell Breaker L and WB Coal Co 1910
Colorado and Pikes Peak Consolidated Mining Cripple Creek
Colorado Bureau of Mines Bell Sign
Cupel Mould

L&WB Badge Front | COAL & IRON POLICE BADGE L&WB COAL - Roundish coal and iron police badge with eagle on top, 2 in. tall by 1 9/16 in. wide, Lehigh & Wilkes-Barre Coal Company’s private police force, part of the industrial police forces known as Coal & Iron Police which were legal in Pennsylvania from 1865 to 1931. Lehigh & Wilkes-Barre Coal Company operated coal mines in the Northern Anthracite Field (Luzerne and Lackawanna Counties). Badge dates from prior to 1929, at which time L&WB was purchased by Glen Alden Coal Company COAL & IRON POLICE - In 1865, the Pennsylvania State Legislature passed State Act 228 which empowered the railroads to organize private police forces. In 1866, a supplement to the act was passed extending the privilege to "embrace all corporations, firms, or individuals, owning, leasing, or being in possession of any colliery, furnace, or rolling mill within this commonwealth." The men of the private police forces were called "Coal and Iron Police" and received commissions from the state although their salaries were paid by the various coal companies for whom they worked. Although they were hired to protect the property of their respective coal companies and the homes of coal company officials, they were used to intimidate and break up striking mine workers, and if necessary, evict them and their families from their homes. In some communities the coal and iron police were accused of assault, kidnapping, rape, and murder. A total of over 7,632 commissions were given for the Coal and Iron Police. On June 30, 1931, Governor Pinchot revoked all coal and iron police commissions, thus ending a 66-year period of sad mining history in the state of Pennsylvania. LEHIGH AND WILKES-BARRE COAL COMPANY – The Lehigh and Wilkes-Barre Coal Company was one of six companies that dominated coal production in the Northern Anthracite Field of Pennsylvania during the later nineteenth century and early twentieth century. The Northern Field, with an area of about 176 square miles, extended through the Lackawanna-Wyoming Valley from Forest City to Shickshinny in a canoe-shaped arc. The coal beds lie in near horizontal layers, gently sloping up the sides of the valley where they are exposed in outcrops running along the flanks. The field is about 55 miles long and has a maximum width of about six miles. Vertical shafts in this field have depths ranging from a few hundred feet to almost 1500 feet at the deepest points in the southern end near Nanticoke. The principal towns in the field are Forrest City, Carbondale, Scranton, Pittston, Wilkes-Barre, Plymouth, Nanticoke and Shickshinny. Other mining companies that conducted major operations here included the Hudson Coal Co.; Lehigh Valley Coal Co.; the Delaware, Lackawanna and Western Coal Mining Co.; the Pennsylvania Coal Co.; and the Susquehanna Coal Co. The Lehigh and Wilkes-Barre Coal Company was formed by the consolidation of Wilkes-Barre Coal and Iron Company and Honey Brook Coal Company on Feb. 6, 1874. The organization with J. Rogers Maxwell as president was conducted under the charter of the Broad Top Mining Company dated June 1871. The company was controlled by the Central Railroad Company of New Jersey which at the time owned nearly all the company stock and bonds. As of 1894, the L&WB Coal Company controlled over 40,000 acres of valuable coal lands in the Wyoming Valley, much of it undeveloped, and operated 11 collieries in the Wilkes-Barre District as the largest coal producer in that district. These collieries included the Hollenback, Empire, South Wilkes-Barre, Stanton, Jersey, Sugar Notch, Lance, Nottingham, Reynolds, Wanamie, and Maxwell. The L&WB Coal Company was purchased by the Glen Alden Coal Company for $86 million on Dec. 31. 1929. Download Original Image
Total images: 226 | Last update: 10/31/17 4:34 PM | Help