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Lietz Attwoods Universal Pocket Instrument
Lietz Attwoods Universal Pocket Instrument with Leather Case
1899 Lietz Catalog Listing for Universal Pocket Instrument
Lorain Coal Promotional Lighter
Lowne's Air Meter
  Lowne's Air Meter with Box.JPG - LOWNE'S AIR METER - Mine ventilation air meter, anodized brass with 8 aluminum vanes at right angle to dial and gear lever to start and stop measurements, 2 5/16 in. dial measuring tens, hundreds and thousands of feet, vane casing 2 3/4 in. dia., dial marked AIR METER, Serial #2025, ROBSON, NEWCASTLE ON TYNE, base marked LOWNE’S SILVER MEDAL AIR METER, with card noting correction for air meter No. 2025 and International Inventions Exhibition Awarded Silver Medal, fitted mahogany box 4 1/4 in. wide x 4 in. deep x 3 3/4 equipped with spigot mounting bracket  (Robert Mann Lowne was the son of a doctor, Benjamin Thompson Lowne, who moved to London to train at Barts Medical College in 1842. He later moved to the Farringdon Dispensary in Bartletts Passage in Holborn. Robert was the second son, born in 1844. His elder brother, also Benjamin Thompson Lowne, became a noted surgeon and lecturer at the Middlesex Hospital, but little is known about Robert's early life. His first patent, taken out in 1865, was for a spirometer, an instrument for measuring the volume of air entering and leaving the lungs showing his knowledge of things medical. From then on a great number of patents were taken out by Robert Mann Lowne and from 1872 he and his family lived in East End, Finchley where he became known as an inventor and scientific instrument maker. His invention of a portable air meter shown here was awarded a silver medal at the International Inventions Exhibition held in London in 1885. Originally produced by Casella in London, this example was made by noted instrument maker F. Robson, Newcastle on Tyne in the late 1800s.  Lowne and his wife, Emily, had four children, two of whom, Robert James Mann Lowne and Benjamin Thomson Lowne, joined him in the business.By 1894 the family moved to Lewisharn where they occupied a large house at 108 Bromley Road. All the work was carried out by the three family members which is quite surprising considering the volume of work undertaken by the company in the early years of the 20th century. The Lowne Electric Clock and Appliance Company was set up in 1904 as a limited company to exploit the patents for electric clocks taken out by the company. Contracts were undertaken to provide the Arsenal with an electric master clock system, with 46 slave clocks needing 6.5 miles of cabling and run from Leclanché cells, as well as one for the South Metropolitan Gas Works.A new workshop at the Bromley Road address was built in 1905 to be able to fulfill these orders. The company did not prosper and was, for a while, taken over in the 1920s by the Magneta Company. The Lownes continued to work at home for Magneta, until 1926 when the company reverted to the Lowne family. The company moved to Boones Street where a former wheelwright's premises was to be their home until 2002. Robert Mann Lowne died in 1928 and his two sons with RJM Lowne's son, Frederick James Mann Lowne, continuing the business. With the advent of the National Grid, mains clocks were possible and so the Lownes made synchronous clocks both for the home and for industry.  Their most profitable years were in the 1940s when war work kept them occupied. The company closed the business and sold off the equipment in 2002.  See Sue Hayton, Greenwich Industrial History, Vol. 5, Issue 3, May 2002)  
Mahanoy City Watch Fob Front
Mahanoy City Watch Fob Front Closeup
Mahanoy City Watch Fob Back
Mahanoy City Watch Fob Back Closeup
Mine & Smelter Supply Co Catalog No. 22 1912

Lowne's Air Meter with Box | LOWNE'S AIR METER - Mine ventilation air meter, anodized brass with 8 aluminum vanes at right angle to dial and gear lever to start and stop measurements, 2 5/16 in. dial measuring tens, hundreds and thousands of feet, vane casing 2 3/4 in. dia., dial marked AIR METER, Serial #2025, ROBSON, NEWCASTLE ON TYNE, base marked LOWNE’S SILVER MEDAL AIR METER, with card noting correction for air meter No. 2025 and International Inventions Exhibition Awarded Silver Medal, fitted mahogany box 4 1/4 in. wide x 4 in. deep x 3 3/4 equipped with spigot mounting bracket (Robert Mann Lowne was the son of a doctor, Benjamin Thompson Lowne, who moved to London to train at Barts Medical College in 1842. He later moved to the Farringdon Dispensary in Bartletts Passage in Holborn. Robert was the second son, born in 1844. His elder brother, also Benjamin Thompson Lowne, became a noted surgeon and lecturer at the Middlesex Hospital, but little is known about Robert's early life. His first patent, taken out in 1865, was for a spirometer, an instrument for measuring the volume of air entering and leaving the lungs showing his knowledge of things medical. From then on a great number of patents were taken out by Robert Mann Lowne and from 1872 he and his family lived in East End, Finchley where he became known as an inventor and scientific instrument maker. His invention of a portable air meter shown here was awarded a silver medal at the International Inventions Exhibition held in London in 1885. Originally produced by Casella in London, this example was made by noted instrument maker F. Robson, Newcastle on Tyne in the late 1800s. Lowne and his wife, Emily, had four children, two of whom, Robert James Mann Lowne and Benjamin Thomson Lowne, joined him in the business. By 1894 the family moved to Lewisharn where they occupied a large house at 108 Bromley Road. All the work was carried out by the three family members which is quite surprising considering the volume of work undertaken by the company in the early years of the 20th century. The Lowne Electric Clock and Appliance Company was set up in 1904 as a limited company to exploit the patents for electric clocks taken out by the company. Contracts were undertaken to provide the Arsenal with an electric master clock system, with 46 slave clocks needing 6.5 miles of cabling and run from Leclanché cells, as well as one for the South Metropolitan Gas Works. A new workshop at the Bromley Road address was built in 1905 to be able to fulfill these orders. The company did not prosper and was, for a while, taken over in the 1920s by the Magneta Company. The Lownes continued to work at home for Magneta, until 1926 when the company reverted to the Lowne family. The company moved to Boones Street where a former wheelwright's premises was to be their home until 2002. Robert Mann Lowne died in 1928 and his two sons with RJM Lowne's son, Frederick James Mann Lowne, continuing the business. With the advent of the National Grid, mains clocks were possible and so the Lownes made synchronous clocks both for the home and for industry. Their most profitable years were in the 1940s when war work kept them occupied. The company closed the business and sold off the equipment in 2002. See Sue Hayton, Greenwich Industrial History, Vol. 5, Issue 3, May 2002) Download Original Image
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