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Coal and Iron Police Badge Front
Coal and Iron Police Badge Back
Woodward_Breaker_1900
L&WB Badge Front
L&WB Badge Back
  Maxwell Breaker L and WB Coal Co 1910.jpg - LEHIGH & WILKES-BARRE COAL CO. MAXWELL BREAKER NO. 20 – Located in Ashley, PA near Wilkes-Barre, at the Maxwell Colliery, it was put into operation by the L & WB Coal Co. in 1895.  Run-of-mine coal arriving at the breaker was washed and cleaned to remove impurities, principally slate. It was crushed and screened to specific sizes desired by customers.  Named for the company president J. Rogers Maxwell, the huge wooden structure was in operation until its closure in 1938. After the Glen Alden Coal Co. purchased the L & WB Coal Co. in 1929, a new breaker was constructed and put into operation in 1939 right next to the Maxwell to meet the demands of the bustling anthracite coal industry in northern Pennsylvania; it was named Huber No. 20 after Glen Alden's chairman, Charles F. Huber.  At the time of its closure, the Maxwell No. 20 was still producing over 600,000 tons of coal annually.  
Colorado and Pikes Peak Consolidated Mining Cripple Creek
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Cupel Mould
Cupel Mould II
Cupel Mould Ad 1899 John Taylor & Co Catalogue

Maxwell Breaker L and WB Coal Co 1910 | LEHIGH & WILKES-BARRE COAL CO. MAXWELL BREAKER NO. 20 – Located in Ashley, PA near Wilkes-Barre, at the Maxwell Colliery, it was put into operation by the L & WB Coal Co. in 1895. Run-of-mine coal arriving at the breaker was washed and cleaned to remove impurities, principally slate. It was crushed and screened to specific sizes desired by customers. Named for the company president J. Rogers Maxwell, the huge wooden structure was in operation until its closure in 1938. After the Glen Alden Coal Co. purchased the L & WB Coal Co. in 1929, a new breaker was constructed and put into operation in 1939 right next to the Maxwell to meet the demands of the bustling anthracite coal industry in northern Pennsylvania; it was named Huber No. 20 after Glen Alden's chairman, Charles F. Huber. At the time of its closure, the Maxwell No. 20 was still producing over 600,000 tons of coal annually. Download Original Image
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