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Queen & Co. Anemometer Dial
Queen & Co. Anemometer with Everhart Marking
Queen & Co. Anemometer
Shanklin Cigarette Case pic1
Shanklin Cigarette Case pic2
  Simmons Hardware Fob Front.JPG - SIMMONS HARDWARE WATCH FOB - Non-ferrous watch or keychain fob shaped like a miners oil wick lamp, 1 1/4 in. x 1 1/8 in. with 4 in. chain, marked “the best scoops are marked Clay Bank Simmons Hardware Co. U.S.A.” on front and “always use Simmons Clay Bank shovels and scoops because they are the best Simmons Hardware Co. U.S.A.” on back, stamped with pat. Feb 12, 07 in corner  [The Simmons Hardware Company was at one time one of the largest wholesale hardware companies in the world.  Edward Campbell Simmons was born in Maryland in 1839 and moved with his merchant father to St. Louis, Missouri in 1846. He started his career in the hardware business at the age of seventeen and by 1859 he entered the firm Wilson Levering and Waters as a clerk. In 1863 Simmons became a junior partner in the firm. Within a year, Levering died, and the name was changed to Waters, Simmons & Company. In 1870 Waters retired, and Simmons renamed the firm E.C. Simmons and Company. In 1874 the company was incorporated, and the name became Simmons Hardware Company, Inc.  He successfully developed the Simmons Hardware Company into one of the most extensive corporations of its kind with divisions in Wichita, Sioux City, Ogden, Toledo, New York, Minneapolis, and headquarters in St. Louis. By the turn of the century warehouse space occupied over 1,500,000 sq. feet. Simmons retired in 1898 and his three sons took over management of the business. Around 1870, Simmons was having a dispute with an ax maker and supplier. Simmons decided he would produce axes with his own brand name. The name he chose was Keen Kutter. Keen Kutter soon became the brand affixed to all of Simmons Hardware Company's highest-quality tools and cutlery. The brand was aggressively promoted and ultimately became one of the most recognized trademarks in America.  Another brand promoted by Simmons was Clay Bank shovels, the advertised logo on this oil wick fob. Why the logo was advertised on an oil wick lamp shape is unknown but Simmons was a major supplier of mining supplies during this time period. The patent date on the fob of Feb. 12, 1907 is also a mystery.  Several patents related to shovels were issued on this date but none could be associated with Clay Bank.  After World War I, in an effort to utilize manufacturing facilities formerly used for production of war-related steel goods, Winchester Repeating Arms Company began production of consumer goods. The difficulty, Winchester soon realized, was distribution. In 1922, two years after the death of E.C. Simmons, Winchester Repeating Arms Company purchased a controlling interest in Simmons Hardware Company, at the time the country's largest distributor of hardware goods, forming The Winchester Simmons Company. In 1930, on the brink of bankruptcy, Winchester severed its association with Simmons Hardware Company and abandoned all lines of production except guns and ammunition. In 1940 Shapleigh Hardware Company bought the trademarks and entire stock of Simmons Hardware Company. Shapleigh Hardware continued to produce the Diamond Edge brand as well as a full line of Keen Kutter goods for the next 20 years. In 1960 Shapleigh Hardware Company went out of business.]   
Simmons Hardware Fob Back
Spedding Steel Mill
Special Police Badge Verona Mining Company Front
Special Police Badge Verona Mining Company Back
Caspian Mine Verona Mining Company 1908 photo

Simmons Hardware Fob Front | SIMMONS HARDWARE WATCH FOB - Non-ferrous watch or keychain fob shaped like a miners oil wick lamp, 1 1/4 in. x 1 1/8 in. with 4 in. chain, marked “the best scoops are marked Clay Bank Simmons Hardware Co. U.S.A.” on front and “always use Simmons Clay Bank shovels and scoops because they are the best Simmons Hardware Co. U.S.A.” on back, stamped with pat. Feb 12, 07 in corner [The Simmons Hardware Company was at one time one of the largest wholesale hardware companies in the world. Edward Campbell Simmons was born in Maryland in 1839 and moved with his merchant father to St. Louis, Missouri in 1846. He started his career in the hardware business at the age of seventeen and by 1859 he entered the firm Wilson Levering and Waters as a clerk. In 1863 Simmons became a junior partner in the firm. Within a year, Levering died, and the name was changed to Waters, Simmons & Company. In 1870 Waters retired, and Simmons renamed the firm E.C. Simmons and Company. In 1874 the company was incorporated, and the name became Simmons Hardware Company, Inc. He successfully developed the Simmons Hardware Company into one of the most extensive corporations of its kind with divisions in Wichita, Sioux City, Ogden, Toledo, New York, Minneapolis, and headquarters in St. Louis. By the turn of the century warehouse space occupied over 1,500,000 sq. feet. Simmons retired in 1898 and his three sons took over management of the business. Around 1870, Simmons was having a dispute with an ax maker and supplier. Simmons decided he would produce axes with his own brand name. The name he chose was Keen Kutter. Keen Kutter soon became the brand affixed to all of Simmons Hardware Company's highest-quality tools and cutlery. The brand was aggressively promoted and ultimately became one of the most recognized trademarks in America. Another brand promoted by Simmons was Clay Bank shovels, the advertised logo on this oil wick fob. Why the logo was advertised on an oil wick lamp shape is unknown but Simmons was a major supplier of mining supplies during this time period. The patent date on the fob of Feb. 12, 1907 is also a mystery. Several patents related to shovels were issued on this date but none could be associated with Clay Bank. After World War I, in an effort to utilize manufacturing facilities formerly used for production of war-related steel goods, Winchester Repeating Arms Company began production of consumer goods. The difficulty, Winchester soon realized, was distribution. In 1922, two years after the death of E.C. Simmons, Winchester Repeating Arms Company purchased a controlling interest in Simmons Hardware Company, at the time the country's largest distributor of hardware goods, forming The Winchester Simmons Company. In 1930, on the brink of bankruptcy, Winchester severed its association with Simmons Hardware Company and abandoned all lines of production except guns and ammunition. In 1940 Shapleigh Hardware Company bought the trademarks and entire stock of Simmons Hardware Company. Shapleigh Hardware continued to produce the Diamond Edge brand as well as a full line of Keen Kutter goods for the next 20 years. In 1960 Shapleigh Hardware Company went out of business.] Download Original Image
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