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  Steinfeld Tag.jpg - ALBERT STEINFELD EQUIPMENT TAG - Original brass tag, 5 3/4 in. x 1 1/2 in., marked ALBERT STEINFELD & CO. AGENTS MINE & MILL SUPPLIES TUCSON, ARIZONA, brass letters on black background  (Albert Steinfeld was identified in the October 27, 1929 edition of the Tucson Daily Citizen as Tucson’s “merchant prince.”  The newspaper article goes on to note that Albert Steinfeld, founder of the great business establishment that bears his name, and for many years president of the Consolidated National Bank, had unquestionably achieved more than any other individual in Tucson's commercial development. Albert Steinfeld was a native of Germany, having been born in Hanover, December 23, 1854. His education and training were obtained chiefly in the United States, however, as the family emigrated to New York City in 1863. He received his education in the public schools and was later employed for two years by a large dry-goods firm. He then came west and located in Denver, where he was employed for a time in the store of an uncle.  In 1872, he came to Tucson to enter the employ of other uncles, Louis and William Zeckendorf, who ran a mercantile establishment under the name of L. Zeckendorf and Company founded earlier in 1866. Six years later, he was made managing partner. Under his direction, the company had grown into the largest mercantile establishment in Arizona and a prominent factor in mining, financing commercial enterprise, as well as numerous livestock and agricultural projects.  As copper mining became a growing industry during the last quarter of the nineteenth century, the Zeckendorf brothers and Albert Steinfeld invested in and helped develop some of Arizona's most important operations, including the Copper Queen, the Ray, and the Omega mines.  However, a disagreement between Steinfeld and Zeckendorf over the operation and eventual sale of the Silver Bell Copper Company mines forty-five miles northwest of Tucson threatened the future of the business. Over the course of a decade, it escalated to the point where it destroyed the business partnership of nephew and uncle, and poisoned their family relationship for generations. In 1904 Steinfeld purchased the interests of his uncle, Louis Zeckendorf, and took control of L. Zeckendorf & Company, Tucson's oldest and finest department store.  He renamed the business Albert Steinfeld & Company that same year. He managed the expansion and operation of the company until his death in Tucson, on February 8, 1935, at the age of eighty-one.  The company continued under different management until it finally closed its doors in 1985.)  
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Steinfeld Tag | ALBERT STEINFELD EQUIPMENT TAG - Original brass tag, 5 3/4 in. x 1 1/2 in., marked ALBERT STEINFELD & CO. AGENTS MINE & MILL SUPPLIES TUCSON, ARIZONA, brass letters on black background (Albert Steinfeld was identified in the October 27, 1929 edition of the Tucson Daily Citizen as Tucson’s “merchant prince.” The newspaper article goes on to note that Albert Steinfeld, founder of the great business establishment that bears his name, and for many years president of the Consolidated National Bank, had unquestionably achieved more than any other individual in Tucson's commercial development. Albert Steinfeld was a native of Germany, having been born in Hanover, December 23, 1854. His education and training were obtained chiefly in the United States, however, as the family emigrated to New York City in 1863. He received his education in the public schools and was later employed for two years by a large dry-goods firm. He then came west and located in Denver, where he was employed for a time in the store of an uncle. In 1872, he came to Tucson to enter the employ of other uncles, Louis and William Zeckendorf, who ran a mercantile establishment under the name of L. Zeckendorf and Company founded earlier in 1866. Six years later, he was made managing partner. Under his direction, the company had grown into the largest mercantile establishment in Arizona and a prominent factor in mining, financing commercial enterprise, as well as numerous livestock and agricultural projects. As copper mining became a growing industry during the last quarter of the nineteenth century, the Zeckendorf brothers and Albert Steinfeld invested in and helped develop some of Arizona's most important operations, including the Copper Queen, the Ray, and the Omega mines. However, a disagreement between Steinfeld and Zeckendorf over the operation and eventual sale of the Silver Bell Copper Company mines forty-five miles northwest of Tucson threatened the future of the business. Over the course of a decade, it escalated to the point where it destroyed the business partnership of nephew and uncle, and poisoned their family relationship for generations. In 1904 Steinfeld purchased the interests of his uncle, Louis Zeckendorf, and took control of L. Zeckendorf & Company, Tucson's oldest and finest department store. He renamed the business Albert Steinfeld & Company that same year. He managed the expansion and operation of the company until his death in Tucson, on February 8, 1935, at the age of eighty-one. The company continued under different management until it finally closed its doors in 1985.) Download Original Image
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