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WFM Butte No 1 Ribbon
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WFM Eureka No 151 Ribbon
WFM Eureka
  WFM Eureka No 151 Member Badge.JPG - W.F.M. EUREKA NO 151 RIBBON - Rare blue, white and gold EUREKA MINERS UNION ribbon/badge showing EUREKA MINERS’ UNION NO. 151, W. F. M. EUREKA, UTAH with metal and celluloid MEMBER badge attached, reverse side is black mourning ribbon; 7 1/2 in. long, 2 1/4 in. wide, badge made by The Whitehead & Hoag Co. Newark, NJ and marked Pat Appld For, W.F.M. No. 151 was organized on February 8, 1902 and represented the miners from Utah’s Tintic Mining District, ex-Terence Hammer collection  [This ribbon ca. 1902 is for the Eureka Miners’ Union No. 151 of the WFM.  Organized on February 8, 1902, it represented the miners of Utah’s Tintic Mining District. The reverse side is a black mourning ribbon.  The Western Federation of Miners (WFM) was a radical labor union that gained a reputation for militancy in the mines of the western United States and British Columbia.  It was formed on May 15, 1893 at a convention held in Butte, MT by representatives of the miners' unions from Utah, South Dakota, Idaho, Montana and Colorado. Its efforts to organize both hard rock miners and smelter workers brought it into sharp conflicts – and often pitched battles – with both employers and governmental authorities. One of the most dramatic of these struggles occurred in the Cripple Creek district in 1903-04, and has been called the Colorado Labor Wars. The WFM also played a key role in the founding of the Industrial Workers of the World in 1905, but left that organization several years later.  The WFM changed its name to the International Union of Mine, Mill, and Smelter Workers (more familiarly referred to as Mine Mill) in 1916. After a period of decline it revived in the early days of the New Deal and helped found the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO) in 1935. The Mine Mill union was expelled from the CIO in 1950 during the post-war red scare for refusing to shed its communist leadership. After spending years fighting off efforts by the United Steelworkers of America (USWA) to raid its membership, Mine Mill and the USWA merged in 1967.Eureka was originally known as Ruby Hollow before it developed into a bustling mining town in 1870 when gold and silver ores were discovered there.  In 1871 the first permanent buildings were built. Located about seventy miles southwest of Salt Lake City, Eureka was incorporated as a city in 1892, becoming the financial center for the Tintic Mining District, a wealthy gold and silver mining area about six miles long by two miles wide which is divided between Utah and Juab counties. The Tintic Mining District, one of the oldest mining districts in Utah, had been established in 1869 (named after a Ute Indian Chief named Tintic) and by 1899 the district became one of the top mineral producing areas in Utah. Eureka housed the "Big Four" mines—Bullion Beck and Champion, Centennial Eureka, Eureka Hill, and Gemini-and later the Chief Consolidated Mining Company.  Eureka was known as one of the quietest mining towns in the west. In 1910 it was the 9th largest city in Utah when its population was around 3500. Between 1930 and 1940 most the mines closed down because of water and low prices. The last major mine closed in 1957.  By the 1980s the population fell below 700.]  
WFM Eureka No 151 Member Badge Back
WFM Eureka No 151 Reverse Side Mourning Ribbon
WFM Terry's Peak No 5 Ribbon
WFM Terry's Peak No 5 Reverse Side Mourning Ribbon
WFM Membership Card Covers

WFM Eureka No 151 Member Badge | W.F.M. EUREKA NO 151 RIBBON - Rare blue, white and gold EUREKA MINERS UNION ribbon/badge showing EUREKA MINERS’ UNION NO. 151, W. F. M. EUREKA, UTAH with metal and celluloid MEMBER badge attached, reverse side is black mourning ribbon; 7 1/2 in. long, 2 1/4 in. wide, badge made by The Whitehead & Hoag Co. Newark, NJ and marked Pat Appld For, W.F.M. No. 151 was organized on February 8, 1902 and represented the miners from Utah’s Tintic Mining District, ex-Terence Hammer collection [This ribbon ca. 1902 is for the Eureka Miners’ Union No. 151 of the WFM. Organized on February 8, 1902, it represented the miners of Utah’s Tintic Mining District. The reverse side is a black mourning ribbon. The Western Federation of Miners (WFM) was a radical labor union that gained a reputation for militancy in the mines of the western United States and British Columbia. It was formed on May 15, 1893 at a convention held in Butte, MT by representatives of the miners' unions from Utah, South Dakota, Idaho, Montana and Colorado. Its efforts to organize both hard rock miners and smelter workers brought it into sharp conflicts – and often pitched battles – with both employers and governmental authorities. One of the most dramatic of these struggles occurred in the Cripple Creek district in 1903-04, and has been called the Colorado Labor Wars. The WFM also played a key role in the founding of the Industrial Workers of the World in 1905, but left that organization several years later. The WFM changed its name to the International Union of Mine, Mill, and Smelter Workers (more familiarly referred to as Mine Mill) in 1916. After a period of decline it revived in the early days of the New Deal and helped found the Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO) in 1935. The Mine Mill union was expelled from the CIO in 1950 during the post-war red scare for refusing to shed its communist leadership. After spending years fighting off efforts by the United Steelworkers of America (USWA) to raid its membership, Mine Mill and the USWA merged in 1967. Eureka was originally known as Ruby Hollow before it developed into a bustling mining town in 1870 when gold and silver ores were discovered there. In 1871 the first permanent buildings were built. Located about seventy miles southwest of Salt Lake City, Eureka was incorporated as a city in 1892, becoming the financial center for the Tintic Mining District, a wealthy gold and silver mining area about six miles long by two miles wide which is divided between Utah and Juab counties. The Tintic Mining District, one of the oldest mining districts in Utah, had been established in 1869 (named after a Ute Indian Chief named Tintic) and by 1899 the district became one of the top mineral producing areas in Utah. Eureka housed the "Big Four" mines—Bullion Beck and Champion, Centennial Eureka, Eureka Hill, and Gemini-and later the Chief Consolidated Mining Company. Eureka was known as one of the quietest mining towns in the west. In 1910 it was the 9th largest city in Utah when its population was around 3500. Between 1930 and 1940 most the mines closed down because of water and low prices. The last major mine closed in 1957. By the 1980s the population fell below 700.] Download Original Image
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