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WFM Eureka No 151 Ribbon
WFM Eureka
WFM Eureka No 151 Member Badge
WFM Eureka No 151 Member Badge Back
WFM Eureka No 151 Reverse Side Mourning Ribbon
  WFM Terry's Peak No 5 Ribbon.JPG - W.F.M. TERRY'S PEAK NO 5 RIBBON - Red, white and gold Terry’s Peak Miners Union ribbon/badge marked TERRY’S PEAK MINERS UNION NO. 5, W. F. of M. TERRY, SOUTH DAK. and ORGANIZED AUGUST 12, 1891, with celluloid badge attached showing miner’s pick, hammer and chisel, reverse side is black mourning ribbon; 7 1/2 in. long, 2 1/4 in. wide, ribbon made by Wm. H. Horstmann Co. Philadelphia, PA, W.F.M. No 5 represented the miners from SD’s Ruby Basin Mining District (This ribbon ca. 1893 is for the Terry’s Peak Miners’ Union No. 5 of the Western Federation of Miners (WFM).  Organized on August 12, 1891, it represented the miners of South Dakota’s Ruby Basin Mining District. The reverse side is a black mourning ribbon for funerals of fellow miners.  The WFM was a radical labor union that gained a reputation for militancy in the mines of the western United States and British Columbia.  It was formed on May 15, 1893 at a convention held in Butte, MT by representatives of the miners' unions from Utah, South Dakota, Idaho, Montana and Colorado. The Terry’s Peak Miners’ Union joined the WFM as one of its earliest members.  Additional information regarding the WFM is presented elsewhere on my website. Terry, South Dakota is located in Lawrence County at the base of a mountain named Terry’s Peak which gave the town its name.  Named after Gen. Alfred H. Terry, Terry lies 7 miles southwest of Deadwood on a line that includes Lead, 3 1/2 miles away.  A post office was established in the unincorporated community of Terry in 1892 and was discontinued in 1929.  Local mining boosted Terry’s growth and by 1900, the community had a population of nearly 1200.  By 1904 Terry had two schools, three hotels, Catholic and Methodist churches, and an emergency hospital.  At an elevation of 5700 feet, Terry was the highest mining town in the Black Hills.  By 1904, two mining companies, the Golden Reward and Horseshoe Mining, literally owned Terry.  J. D. Irving’s 1904 USGS Professional Paper No. 26 Economic Resources of the Northern Black Hills identifies 29 operating mines in the Ruby Basin Mining District.  The Golden Reward was the second richest mine of the Black Hills in gold production.  The Terry’s Peak Union was the most prosperous WFM member in the Black Hills numbering nearly 700 miners.  The union owned its own building which included a large hall on the second story.  As the mines played out, miners and the businesses of Terry departed.  Other than the boom and bust of the mining town, it seems the most noteworthy happening in Terry was that Martha Jane Cannary (aka Calamity Jane) died in a Terry hotel in 1903.   In 1980 Terry met its demise as the Homestake Mine expanded surface mining operations.  Today, all that remains of Terry is the cemetery.)  
WFM Terry's Peak No 5 Reverse Side Mourning Ribbon
WFM Membership Card Covers
WFM Membership Card Pg 1-2
WFM Membership Card Pg 3-4
WFM Membership Card Pg 5-6

WFM Terry's Peak No 5 Ribbon | W.F.M. TERRY'S PEAK NO 5 RIBBON - Red, white and gold Terry’s Peak Miners Union ribbon/badge marked TERRY’S PEAK MINERS UNION NO. 5, W. F. of M. TERRY, SOUTH DAK. and ORGANIZED AUGUST 12, 1891, with celluloid badge attached showing miner’s pick, hammer and chisel, reverse side is black mourning ribbon; 7 1/2 in. long, 2 1/4 in. wide, ribbon made by Wm. H. Horstmann Co. Philadelphia, PA, W.F.M. No 5 represented the miners from SD’s Ruby Basin Mining District (This ribbon ca. 1893 is for the Terry’s Peak Miners’ Union No. 5 of the Western Federation of Miners (WFM). Organized on August 12, 1891, it represented the miners of South Dakota’s Ruby Basin Mining District. The reverse side is a black mourning ribbon for funerals of fellow miners. The WFM was a radical labor union that gained a reputation for militancy in the mines of the western United States and British Columbia. It was formed on May 15, 1893 at a convention held in Butte, MT by representatives of the miners' unions from Utah, South Dakota, Idaho, Montana and Colorado. The Terry’s Peak Miners’ Union joined the WFM as one of its earliest members. Additional information regarding the WFM is presented elsewhere on my website. Terry, South Dakota is located in Lawrence County at the base of a mountain named Terry’s Peak which gave the town its name. Named after Gen. Alfred H. Terry, Terry lies 7 miles southwest of Deadwood on a line that includes Lead, 3 1/2 miles away. A post office was established in the unincorporated community of Terry in 1892 and was discontinued in 1929. Local mining boosted Terry’s growth and by 1900, the community had a population of nearly 1200. By 1904 Terry had two schools, three hotels, Catholic and Methodist churches, and an emergency hospital. At an elevation of 5700 feet, Terry was the highest mining town in the Black Hills. By 1904, two mining companies, the Golden Reward and Horseshoe Mining, literally owned Terry. J. D. Irving’s 1904 USGS Professional Paper No. 26 Economic Resources of the Northern Black Hills identifies 29 operating mines in the Ruby Basin Mining District. The Golden Reward was the second richest mine of the Black Hills in gold production. The Terry’s Peak Union was the most prosperous WFM member in the Black Hills numbering nearly 700 miners. The union owned its own building which included a large hall on the second story. As the mines played out, miners and the businesses of Terry departed. Other than the boom and bust of the mining town, it seems the most noteworthy happening in Terry was that Martha Jane Cannary (aka Calamity Jane) died in a Terry hotel in 1903. In 1980 Terry met its demise as the Homestake Mine expanded surface mining operations. Today, all that remains of Terry is the cemetery.) Download Original Image
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