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Anton Lady Liberty II
Anton Lady Liberty II Marking
Anton Lady Liberty III
Anton Lady Liberty Brass RSide
Anton Lady Liberty Brass LSide
  Anton Lady Liberty Brass Open Top.JPG - CHRISTOPHER ANTON BRASS LADY LIBERTY - Brass face lamp, Liberty trademark on right side marked LIBERTY, C. L.ANTON MFGR. AND PATENTEE, MONONGAHELA CITY, WASHINGTON CO., PA; marked on left side PATENTED JULY 23-1901, 2 1/8 in. high to lid, 1 5/8 in. base dia., with 2 3/4 in. sunshine spout, unfired, ex-Dave Thorpe collection (Arguably the Antons were the premier wick lamp makers in the U. S.; in 1874, Christopher Anton set up a workshop to manufacture wick lamps for local PA coal miners; his business expanded and he and his two brothers marketed their lamps worldwide and were known for their quality workmanship and attractive stampings.  The Lady Liberty stamping shown here is one of the most creative and attractive stampings known not only of Anton wick lamps but of all wick lamps.  It’s a favorite of many collectors.  Clearly, the artist who created the Lady Liberty took some artistic features from the Statue of Liberty which was dedicated in the middle of New York Harbor some 15 years earlier in 1886.  The intricate detail of the stamping shows some interesting variations from the original Statue.  Instead of a lighted torch in her right hand, Lady Liberty is holding an oil wick lamp, similar to the lamp as stamped.  I should have added her right hand on her right arm because, interestingly, the artist chose to put a right hand on her left arm as well.  Her left arm is holding a flag pole with a flag similar looking to the US flag rather than the tablet inscribed with the date of the Declaration of Independence of the Statue.  Again artistic license seemed to be at work.  Lady Liberty’s flag has 11 stripes and 12 stars rather than the 13 stripes and 45 stars of the 1901 American flag. The Lady Liberty stamping is found on various face and driver oil wick lamps in both tin (as shown elsewhere in my pics) and brass as shown here.  Unlike the tin versions, many of the much harder-to-find brass lamps also have the Patented July 23-1901 stamping on the left side as well.  This stamping refers to Patent No. 678,852 which was awarded to C. L. Anton on July 23, 1901 for a spout joint design.  This same stamping occurs on the spout of other brass Anton lamps (shown elsewhere in my pics) without the Lady Liberty stamping but seemingly not on any of the tin versions.  The Antons left their mark in the production of oil wick lamps including other attractive stampings of Globe and USA Eagle, but for my money the Lady Liberty is still number one.  The Anton business in oil wick lamps closed in 1918.)  
Anton Lady Liberty Brass Marking
Anton Lady Liberty Brass Pat Date Marking
B. E. Leonard RSide
B. E. Leonard LSide
B. E. Leonard Marking

Anton Lady Liberty Brass Open Top | CHRISTOPHER ANTON BRASS LADY LIBERTY - Brass face lamp, Liberty trademark on right side marked LIBERTY, C. L.ANTON MFGR. AND PATENTEE, MONONGAHELA CITY, WASHINGTON CO., PA; marked on left side PATENTED JULY 23-1901, 2 1/8 in. high to lid, 1 5/8 in. base dia., with 2 3/4 in. sunshine spout, unfired, ex-Dave Thorpe collection (Arguably the Antons were the premier wick lamp makers in the U. S.; in 1874, Christopher Anton set up a workshop to manufacture wick lamps for local PA coal miners; his business expanded and he and his two brothers marketed their lamps worldwide and were known for their quality workmanship and attractive stampings. The Lady Liberty stamping shown here is one of the most creative and attractive stampings known not only of Anton wick lamps but of all wick lamps. It’s a favorite of many collectors. Clearly, the artist who created the Lady Liberty took some artistic features from the Statue of Liberty which was dedicated in the middle of New York Harbor some 15 years earlier in 1886. The intricate detail of the stamping shows some interesting variations from the original Statue. Instead of a lighted torch in her right hand, Lady Liberty is holding an oil wick lamp, similar to the lamp as stamped. I should have added her right hand on her right arm because, interestingly, the artist chose to put a right hand on her left arm as well. Her left arm is holding a flag pole with a flag similar looking to the US flag rather than the tablet inscribed with the date of the Declaration of Independence of the Statue. Again artistic license seemed to be at work. Lady Liberty’s flag has 11 stripes and 12 stars rather than the 13 stripes and 45 stars of the 1901 American flag. The Lady Liberty stamping is found on various face and driver oil wick lamps in both tin (as shown elsewhere in my pics) and brass as shown here. Unlike the tin versions, many of the much harder-to-find brass lamps also have the Patented July 23-1901 stamping on the left side as well. This stamping refers to Patent No. 678,852 which was awarded to C. L. Anton on July 23, 1901 for a spout joint design. This same stamping occurs on the spout of other brass Anton lamps (shown elsewhere in my pics) without the Lady Liberty stamping but seemingly not on any of the tin versions. The Antons left their mark in the production of oil wick lamps including other attractive stampings of Globe and USA Eagle, but for my money the Lady Liberty is still number one. The Anton business in oil wick lamps closed in 1918.) Download Original Image
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