Up Oilwick Lamps Prev Next Slideshow

 Previous image  Next image  Index page  Original Image [Dunlap Shield.JPG - 99kB]
Dunlap I
Dunlap II
Dunlap Monongahela Valley
Dunlap Monongahela Valley II
Dunlap Monongahela Valley II Marking
  Dunlap Shield.JPG - DUNLAP’S, PITTSBURG WITH FLAME SHIELD - Tin driver’s lamp, with large shield, solderless, marked DUNLAP’S, PITTSBURG; ex-Dave Lewis collection  (John Dunlap was born in Ireland in 1818.  At the age of 8 he was brought to New Jersey by his mother.  After schooling, he apprenticed in the tinning trade.  After completing his apprenticeship, he moved to Pittsburgh where he started a small tinning business.  In 1845, he restarted his business that soon became the leading tinning firm in Pittsburgh.  After his death in 1893, his sons William and John continued the business that was now manufacturing wick lamps.  Dunlap produced two varieties of wick lamps.  The most common lamp  is a milkcan shape with spelter coating with the hook mechanically attached with rivets.  Both tin face and drivers lamps were produced and stamped DUNLAP'S PITTSBURG.  A rare copper face lamp stamped PAT. APL'D FOR is the earliest know Dunlap's lamp.  Also, a spelter coated drivers lamp with a large, heavily braced shield shown in this photo was also produced.  The less common variety is the Monongahela Valley John Dunlap lamp produced in three different stampings.  The Monongahela Valley lamps were marketed through several mining supply firms.  See Johnson, Eureka #11, pp 6-9)  
Dunlap Shield Patent
Felix I
Felix II
Felix Large
Felix Large Marking

Dunlap Shield | DUNLAP’S, PITTSBURG WITH FLAME SHIELD - Tin driver’s lamp, with large shield, solderless, marked DUNLAP’S, PITTSBURG; ex-Dave Lewis collection (John Dunlap was born in Ireland in 1818. At the age of 8 he was brought to New Jersey by his mother. After schooling, he apprenticed in the tinning trade. After completing his apprenticeship, he moved to Pittsburgh where he started a small tinning business. In 1845, he restarted his business that soon became the leading tinning firm in Pittsburgh. After his death in 1893, his sons William and John continued the business that was now manufacturing wick lamps. Dunlap produced two varieties of wick lamps. The most common lamp is a milkcan shape with spelter coating with the hook mechanically attached with rivets. Both tin face and drivers lamps were produced and stamped DUNLAP'S PITTSBURG. A rare copper face lamp stamped PAT. APL'D FOR is the earliest know Dunlap's lamp. Also, a spelter coated drivers lamp with a large, heavily braced shield shown in this photo was also produced. The less common variety is the Monongahela Valley John Dunlap lamp produced in three different stampings. The Monongahela Valley lamps were marketed through several mining supply firms. See Johnson, Eureka #11, pp 6-9) Download Original Image
Total images: 714 | Last update: 8/7/16 2:45 PM | Help