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Eagen Carbide Carrier Front
Eagen Carbide Carrier Marking
  Eagen Carbide Carrier Top.JPG - JAMES EAGEN 5 LB CARBIDE CARRIER - James Eagan 5 lb. Carbide Carrier made by the Wilkes-Barre Can Co. of Wilkes-Barre, PA. Red tin can with black lettering has threaded lid and a bail handle. It is marked as follows: JAMES EAGEN 5LB. CARBIDE CARRIER WYOMING, PA and in small type WILKES-BARRE CAN CO. WILKES-BARRE, PA.  Carrier measures approx. 6 1/4" tall and 5 1/4" in diameter. James Eagen was originally founded in 1875 as a blacksmith shop by James Eagen in Wyoming, PA. Eagen settled in northeastern Pennsylvania in the early 1870's during the construction of the canal systems along the Susquehanna River which is where he learned his trade. Most of his work was related to the anthracite coal mining industry which was flourishing at the time. Eventually a line of mine supplies was added and Eagen began to manufacture and stock tools for the miners. In the 1930's stokers were being developed. The design relationship between the drills being made for the miners and stoker worm were very similar. The company found the opportunity and started making stoker worms. This served as a catalyst for the entry into the flight and feed screw business. The firm is still in business today as James Eagan Sons Company.The Wilkes-Barre Can Co., a new corporation, took over the capital stock and plant of W. B. Bertels & Sons Co. in Wilkes-Barre, PA in 1916. W.B. Bertels began in 1873 and in 1908 became W.B. Bertels & Sons, Inc. Bertels was a tinware manufacturer who produced miners' oilwick cap lamps (see examples in the oilwick section), lunch pails, oil and carbide flasks, and many tinware containers and advertising pieces.While the 5 lb. red tin is a seldom seen mining artifact from the coal fields of Pennsylvania, a 10 lb. black and white carbide carrier tin was also made by James Eagen and is very rare in any collection.  
Grier Carrier
Grier Carrier Clip Side
Grier Carrier Bottom Side
Grier Carrier Bottoms
Grier Carrier Markings

Eagen Carbide Carrier Top | JAMES EAGEN 5 LB CARBIDE CARRIER - James Eagan 5 lb. Carbide Carrier made by the Wilkes-Barre Can Co. of Wilkes-Barre, PA. Red tin can with black lettering has threaded lid and a bail handle. It is marked as follows: JAMES EAGEN 5LB. CARBIDE CARRIER WYOMING, PA and in small type WILKES-BARRE CAN CO. WILKES-BARRE, PA. Carrier measures approx. 6 1/4" tall and 5 1/4" in diameter. James Eagen was originally founded in 1875 as a blacksmith shop by James Eagen in Wyoming, PA. Eagen settled in northeastern Pennsylvania in the early 1870's during the construction of the canal systems along the Susquehanna River which is where he learned his trade. Most of his work was related to the anthracite coal mining industry which was flourishing at the time. Eventually a line of mine supplies was added and Eagen began to manufacture and stock tools for the miners. In the 1930's stokers were being developed. The design relationship between the drills being made for the miners and stoker worm were very similar. The company found the opportunity and started making stoker worms. This served as a catalyst for the entry into the flight and feed screw business. The firm is still in business today as James Eagan Sons Company. The Wilkes-Barre Can Co., a new corporation, took over the capital stock and plant of W. B. Bertels & Sons Co. in Wilkes-Barre, PA in 1916. W.B. Bertels began in 1873 and in 1908 became W.B. Bertels & Sons, Inc. Bertels was a tinware manufacturer who produced miners' oilwick cap lamps (see examples in the oilwick section), lunch pails, oil and carbide flasks, and many tinware containers and advertising pieces. While the 5 lb. red tin is a seldom seen mining artifact from the coal fields of Pennsylvania, a 10 lb. black and white carbide carrier tin was also made by James Eagen and is very rare in any collection. Download Original Image
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