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  Union Carbide Linde Air Can Front.jpg - UNION CARBIDE LINDE AIR CARBIDE CAN - Union Carbide 2 lb can, grey withdark blue stripes, marked MINERS LAMP, 3 1/2 in. dia. and 5 3/8 in. tall, HALF INCH FOR CARBIDE LAMPS, UNION CARBIDE AND CARBON CORPORATION, toP marked UNION CARBIDE TRADE MARK, Sears, Roebuck and Co. sales sticker marked 65¢ attached  (This 2 lb. carbide can is marked “sold by Linde Air Products Company a Division of Union Carbide and Carbon Corporation.”  The Linde Air Products Company was formed by German engineer Carl Paul von Linde (11 June 1842 - 16 November 1934) in Cleveland, Ohio in 1907.  A prolific inventor, one of von Linde’s major accomplishments was the development of a process to liquefy air and then obtain oxygen and nitrogen directly from the liquefied air.  The Linde Company's relationship with Union Carbide started around 1911, when the two competitors undertook joint experiments regarding the production and application of acetylene. Union Carbide had been formed in 1898 to manufacture calcium carbide.  On November 1, 1917, Linde pooled its resources with National Carbon Co., Inc., Prest-O-Lite Co., Inc., Electro Metallurgical Co., and Union Carbide Co. to form Union Carbide and Carbon Corporation. The new entity was organized as a holding company, with its five members acting relatively autonomously and cooperating where their businesses converged. As a subsidiary of one of the United States' largest chemical companies, Linde soon became one of the world's largest producers of such industrial gases as acetylene, hydrogen, and nitrogen, which formed the foundation of the petrochemical industry.  The Union Carbide and Carbon Corporation’s name was changed to Union Carbide Corporation in 1957 to reflect its reorganization from a holding company to a diversified corporation. By that time, Union Carbide and Carbon Corporation had established some 400 plants in the United States and Canada, in addition to overseas affiliates.)  
Union Carbide Linde Air Can Back
Union Carbide Can Back
Union Carbide Can Front
Union Carbide Booklet
Union Carbide Flask Front

Union Carbide Linde Air Can Front | UNION CARBIDE LINDE AIR CARBIDE CAN - Union Carbide 2 lb can, grey with dark blue stripes, marked MINERS LAMP, 3 1/2 in. dia. and 5 3/8 in. tall, HALF INCH FOR CARBIDE LAMPS, UNION CARBIDE AND CARBON CORPORATION, toP marked UNION CARBIDE TRADE MARK, Sears, Roebuck and Co. sales sticker marked 65¢ attached (This 2 lb. carbide can is marked “sold by Linde Air Products Company a Division of Union Carbide and Carbon Corporation.” The Linde Air Products Company was formed by German engineer Carl Paul von Linde (11 June 1842 - 16 November 1934) in Cleveland, Ohio in 1907. A prolific inventor, one of von Linde’s major accomplishments was the development of a process to liquefy air and then obtain oxygen and nitrogen directly from the liquefied air. The Linde Company's relationship with Union Carbide started around 1911, when the two competitors undertook joint experiments regarding the production and application of acetylene. Union Carbide had been formed in 1898 to manufacture calcium carbide. On November 1, 1917, Linde pooled its resources with National Carbon Co., Inc., Prest-O-Lite Co., Inc., Electro Metallurgical Co., and Union Carbide Co. to form Union Carbide and Carbon Corporation. The new entity was organized as a holding company, with its five members acting relatively autonomously and cooperating where their businesses converged. As a subsidiary of one of the United States' largest chemical companies, Linde soon became one of the world's largest producers of such industrial gases as acetylene, hydrogen, and nitrogen, which formed the foundation of the petrochemical industry. The Union Carbide and Carbon Corporation’s name was changed to Union Carbide Corporation in 1957 to reflect its reorganization from a holding company to a diversified corporation. By that time, Union Carbide and Carbon Corporation had established some 400 plants in the United States and Canada, in addition to overseas affiliates.) Download Original Image
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