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ASL&MSCo Davy I
ASL&MSCo Davy I Open
ASL&MSCo Davy I Base Marking
ASL&MSCo Davy II
ASL&MSCo Davy II Open
  ASL&MSCo Davy II Marking.JPG - AMERICAN SAFETY LAMP DAVY II - Brass safety lamp, Davy Newcastle style lamp, 9 1/2 in. tall to top with3 in. hook, marked on top A.S.L.& M.S.CO. (American Safety Lamp &Mine Supply Co.), marked 104 inside base and 10 over top of screw lock  [The American Safety Lamp and Mine Supply Co. along with James Everhart and Hughes Bros. were the big three manufacturers of American safety lamps at the start of the 20th century.  All three were located in Scranton PA.  American Safety Lamp and Mine Supply Co. was incorporated on Mar. 8, 1893 with a capitalization of $100,000.  Officers included M. E. McDonald president, O. S. Johnson vice president, Alexander Dick secretary, and A. H. Christy treasurer.  They were first listed in the 1893-1894 Scranton Business Directory as brass founders.  Later editions listed them as safety lamp manufacturers as well.  They were located at 1321-1335 Capouse Ave. in Scranton at the works and land formerly occupied by the Scranton Iron and Brass Co. which they purchased.  They offered a variety of safety lamps and at least one rare unmarked cast aluminum oil wick lamp with a flat back which their advertising called the indestructible.  The company went out of business in 1930.  The big three safety lamp manufacturers also shared a similar situation after the U. S. Bureau of Mines was established in 1910 with the charter of increasing mine safety.  Part of that effort resulted in a schedule for safety lamp testing issued in 1915.  None of the safety lamps manufactured by these three companies were approved by the Bureau of Mines for underground use.  After World War I, the safety lamp market in the US was dominated by the Wolf Safety Lamp Co. and Koehler Manufacturing whose lamps were approved as permissible by the Bureau of Mines.]  
ASL&MSCo Davy III
ASL&MSCo Davy III Open
ASL&MSCo Davy III Top Marking
ASL&MSCo Davy III Base Marking
ASL&MSCo Davy IV

ASL&MSCo Davy II Marking | AMERICAN SAFETY LAMP DAVY II - Brass safety lamp, Davy Newcastle style lamp, 9 1/2 in. tall to top with 3 in. hook, marked on top A.S.L.& M.S.CO. (American Safety Lamp & Mine Supply Co.), marked 104 inside base and 10 over top of screw lock [The American Safety Lamp and Mine Supply Co. along with James Everhart and Hughes Bros. were the big three manufacturers of American safety lamps at the start of the 20th century. All three were located in Scranton PA. American Safety Lamp and Mine Supply Co. was incorporated on Mar. 8, 1893 with a capitalization of $100,000. Officers included M. E. McDonald president, O. S. Johnson vice president, Alexander Dick secretary, and A. H. Christy treasurer. They were first listed in the 1893-1894 Scranton Business Directory as brass founders. Later editions listed them as safety lamp manufacturers as well. They were located at 1321-1335 Capouse Ave. in Scranton at the works and land formerly occupied by the Scranton Iron and Brass Co. which they purchased. They offered a variety of safety lamps and at least one rare unmarked cast aluminum oil wick lamp with a flat back which their advertising called the indestructible. The company went out of business in 1930. The big three safety lamp manufacturers also shared a similar situation after the U. S. Bureau of Mines was established in 1910 with the charter of increasing mine safety. Part of that effort resulted in a schedule for safety lamp testing issued in 1915. None of the safety lamps manufactured by these three companies were approved by the Bureau of Mines for underground use. After World War I, the safety lamp market in the US was dominated by the Wolf Safety Lamp Co. and Koehler Manufacturing whose lamps were approved as permissible by the Bureau of Mines.] Download Original Image
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