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Wolf Junior Early
Wolf Junior Early Open
Wolf Junior Later
Wolf Junior Later Open
Wolf Juniors
  Wolf Family - Baby, Junior and Standard.JPG - WOLF FAMILY - Shown left to right are the Baby Wolf, Wolf Junior and Wolf Standard safety lamps.  The Baby Wolf is 7 1/4 in. tall, the early Junior is 10 in. tall and the Standard is 11 3/4 in. tall, all measured to the top of the hook ring.  All three lamps were approved as permissible by the US Bureau of Mines.  The Baby Wolf was approved as a methane detector and the Junior and Standard as safety lamps.  As of June 1937, Bureau of Mines testing of Wolf lamps to Schedules 7, 7A and 7B resulted in 5 permissible approval numbers - 204, 205, 206, 207 and 208.  In all cases, the lamps are bonneted and have magnetic locks.  No. 204 was issued July 18, 1921 for the standard lamp with a brass frame, double steel or brass gauzes and round wick.  No. 205 was issued April 24, 1924 for the standard lamp with an aluminum frame, double steel or brass gauzes and round wick.  No. 206, also issued April 24, 1924, is the same as No. 205 but with a flat wick.  No. 207 was issued Nov. 21, 1924 for the Baby Wolf flame type methane detector with aluminum frame and bonnet, double steel or brass gauzes, round wick, and internal relighter.  No. 208 was issued Mar. 14, 1927 as the same as No. 204 but with a flat wick.  Finally, the Wolf Junior was approved as No. 210 on May 6, 1949.  Wolf lamps were also approved by the Bureau of Mines for interchangeability of certain parts including fuel-font assembly, bonnet assembly, air protective ring, magnetic lock ring assembly and glass chimneys.  See Forbes and Grove, Mine Gases and Methods for their Detection, Miners' Circular 33 Revised June 1937, U.S. Bureau of Mines and same, Miners' Circular 33 Revised March 1954  
Wolf Fuel Canisters
Wolf Brass
Wolf Magnetic Lock
Wolf Standard Magnetic Lock Open
Wolf Standard  USBM Permissible Marking

Wolf Family - Baby, Junior and Standard | WOLF FAMILY - Shown left to right are the Baby Wolf, Wolf Junior and Wolf Standard safety lamps. The Baby Wolf is 7 1/4 in. tall, the early Junior is 10 in. tall and the Standard is 11 3/4 in. tall, all measured to the top of the hook ring. All three lamps were approved as permissible by the US Bureau of Mines. The Baby Wolf was approved as a methane detector and the Junior and Standard as safety lamps. As of June 1937, Bureau of Mines testing of Wolf lamps to Schedules 7, 7A and 7B resulted in 5 permissible approval numbers - 204, 205, 206, 207 and 208. In all cases, the lamps are bonneted and have magnetic locks. No. 204 was issued July 18, 1921 for the standard lamp with a brass frame, double steel or brass gauzes and round wick. No. 205 was issued April 24, 1924 for the standard lamp with an aluminum frame, double steel or brass gauzes and round wick. No. 206, also issued April 24, 1924, is the same as No. 205 but with a flat wick. No. 207 was issued Nov. 21, 1924 for the Baby Wolf flame type methane detector with aluminum frame and bonnet, double steel or brass gauzes, round wick, and internal relighter. No. 208 was issued Mar. 14, 1927 as the same as No. 204 but with a flat wick. Finally, the Wolf Junior was approved as No. 210 on May 6, 1949. Wolf lamps were also approved by the Bureau of Mines for interchangeability of certain parts including fuel-font assembly, bonnet assembly, air protective ring, magnetic lock ring assembly and glass chimneys. See Forbes and Grove, Mine Gases and Methods for their Detection, Miners' Circular 33 Revised June 1937, U.S. Bureau of Mines and same, Miners' Circular 33 Revised March 1954 Download Original Image
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