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Souvenir Mining Spoon Tomboy Mine Reverse
Yellow Aster Mine and Mill Randsburg CA ca 1900
Souvenir Mining Spoon Yellow Aster Mine and Mill
Souvenir Mining Spoon Yellow Aster Mine and Mill Randsburg CA
Souvenir Mining Spoon Yellow Aster Mine and Mill Bowl Marking
  IMG_Souvenir Mining Spoon Yellow Aster Mine and Mill Reverse.JPG - SOUVENIR MINING SPOON YELLOW ASTER MINE AND MILL RANDSBURG CA - Sterling silver spoon, 5 7/8 in. long, engraved mining scene in bowl with marking YELLOW ASTER MILLS RANDSBURG, CAL made by R. Wallace & Sons with peony pattern handle, ca. 1910, back with Sterling mark and Wallace makers mark, Peony pattern introduced in 1906 (The Yellow Aster Mine is located in the western Mojave Desert outside the living ghost town of Randsburg, California 17 miles south of Ridgecrest at an elevation of 3504 ft.  The Yellow Aster was the major producer in Kern County producing nearly $25M of gold most of which was mined and sold at pre-1934 prices.  The mine was operated continuously by the Yellow Aster Mining and Milling Co. from 1895 to 1918, closed until 1921, then reopened and operated until 1933. The Anglo American Mining Corp. Ltd. leased the mine in 1933 and operated it until 1939. Since that time it has been mined intermittently by lessees who have worked at various places underground and in the walls of a large open pit.  The mine was discovered by Frederic Mooers, Charles Burcham and John Singleton who staked their claim on April 25, 1895.  The partners initially named it the Rand Mine and incorporated as the Rand Mountain Mining Company, named for the Rand Gold Mining District in South Africa, but soon changed the name to Yellow Aster Mining and Milling, from a new novel one of the men was reading at the time. For a few months following its discovery of the Yellow Aster property, rich gold-bearing placer was worked in dry washers. Following the depletion of the richer placer material, mining was conducted underground and by 1905 about seven and one half miles of horizontal underground workings had been driven. Most of the ore mined from 1905 to 1933 was obtained from a large glory hole, but underground mining was continued and, by 1909, workings totaled between 12 and 15 miles in length. About 1938, open pit mining was begun on the walls of the glory hole and continued until the mine was closed in 1939.  In 1898, a 30 stamp mill with amalgamation plates was built at the mine, and in 1901, a 100-stamp mill was added. In 1916 the 30 stamp mill was abandoned, and in 1918 a new crushing and screening plant was constructed.  After the Yellow Aster Mine was discovered on the slopes of Rand Mountain in 1895, the town of Randsburg (originally known as Rand Camp) sprang up almost overnight to support the mine. By the start of 1896 there were five wooden buildings, including stables, corral, saloon and about thirty tents.  By 1899, the town had over 3,500 residents. Today about 69 people still reside here according to the 2010 census. The Rand Mining District was organized Dec. 20, 1895, out of the Summit Range District. During the first half of the 20th Century, the Rand Mining District with the Yellow Aster as its major producer was the principal gold producing region of California.)    
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IMG Souvenir Mining Spoon Yellow Aster Mine and Mill Reverse | SOUVENIR MINING SPOON YELLOW ASTER MINE AND MILL RANDSBURG CA - Sterling silver spoon, 5 7/8 in. long, engraved mining scene in bowl with marking YELLOW ASTER MILLS RANDSBURG, CAL made by R. Wallace & Sons with peony pattern handle, ca. 1910, back with Sterling mark and Wallace makers mark, Peony pattern introduced in 1906 (The Yellow Aster Mine is located in the western Mojave Desert outside the living ghost town of Randsburg, California 17 miles south of Ridgecrest at an elevation of 3504 ft. The Yellow Aster was the major producer in Kern County producing nearly $25M of gold most of which was mined and sold at pre-1934 prices. The mine was operated continuously by the Yellow Aster Mining and Milling Co. from 1895 to 1918, closed until 1921, then reopened and operated until 1933. The Anglo American Mining Corp. Ltd. leased the mine in 1933 and operated it until 1939. Since that time it has been mined intermittently by lessees who have worked at various places underground and in the walls of a large open pit. The mine was discovered by Frederic Mooers, Charles Burcham and John Singleton who staked their claim on April 25, 1895. The partners initially named it the Rand Mine and incorporated as the Rand Mountain Mining Company, named for the Rand Gold Mining District in South Africa, but soon changed the name to Yellow Aster Mining and Milling, from a new novel one of the men was reading at the time. For a few months following its discovery of the Yellow Aster property, rich gold-bearing placer was worked in dry washers. Following the depletion of the richer placer material, mining was conducted underground and by 1905 about seven and one half miles of horizontal underground workings had been driven. Most of the ore mined from 1905 to 1933 was obtained from a large glory hole, but underground mining was continued and, by 1909, workings totaled between 12 and 15 miles in length. About 1938, open pit mining was begun on the walls of the glory hole and continued until the mine was closed in 1939. In 1898, a 30 stamp mill with amalgamation plates was built at the mine, and in 1901, a 100-stamp mill was added. In 1916 the 30 stamp mill was abandoned, and in 1918 a new crushing and screening plant was constructed. After the Yellow Aster Mine was discovered on the slopes of Rand Mountain in 1895, the town of Randsburg (originally known as Rand Camp) sprang up almost overnight to support the mine. By the start of 1896 there were five wooden buildings, including stables, corral, saloon and about thirty tents. By 1899, the town had over 3,500 residents. Today about 69 people still reside here according to the 2010 census. The Rand Mining District was organized Dec. 20, 1895, out of the Summit Range District. During the first half of the 20th Century, the Rand Mining District with the Yellow Aster as its major producer was the principal gold producing region of California.) Download Original Image
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