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Souvenir Mining Spoon Morning Mill Mullan ID
Souvenir Mining Spoon Bowl Morning Mill Mullan ID
Souvenir Mining Spoon Reverse Morning Mill Mullan ID
Nevada City 1866
Nevada City CA Gold Panning
  Nevada City CA.JPG - SOUVENIR MINING SPOON NEVADA CITY CA - Sterling demitasse spoon with embossed bowl showing miner panning a stream with a crossed shovel and pick in foreground, top of handle shows a bear looking over a gold pan with nuggets, marked CALIFORNIA around edge of pan and NEVADA CITY in bottom of pan, crossed pick and shovel behind pan with silver rope wrapped around decorative handle, reverse marked Sterling, 4 3/8 in. long  [Located in California's Sierra Nevada, Nevada City is the county seat of Nevada County, 60 miles northeast of Sacramento.  Originally a mining camp founded along Deer Creek in 1849, Nevada City was known by many monikers through its history including Caldwell's Upper Store, Coyoteville, and Deer Creek Dry Diggings. The name Nevada was adopted in May 1850 at a public meeting, having derived its name after the Spanish word for snow. City was added later after Nevada became a state.  After gold was discovered in Deer Creek, Nevada City rapidly became the largest and wealthiest mining town in California, with 10,000 residents and the third largest city in California at the time.  During the period of 1848-1965, Nevada County produced the largest amount of gold in California at over $440 million.  During the gold rush period, Nevada City was known for its coyote or drift diggings, while its sister town Grass Valley became the center for lode mining.  Nevada City maintained a long history of gold mining operations with 16 major mines in the area.  Mining in the area also changed the landscape dramatically.   Hydraulic mining, where miners aimed high-pressure hydraulic monitors, like large water cannons, at the hillsides to strip away gravel in search of gold, was first practiced in California at American Hill here in 1852 by E. G. Matteson before environmental concerns stopped the practice in the 1880s.]  
Nevada City CA Gold Panning Bowl
Nevada City CA Gold Panning Top
Nevada City CA Reverse
Nome 1900
Souvenir Mining Spoon Nome Alaska

Nevada City CA | SOUVENIR MINING SPOON NEVADA CITY CA - Sterling demitasse spoon with embossed bowl showing miner panning a stream with a crossed shovel and pick in foreground, top of handle shows a bear looking over a gold pan with nuggets, marked CALIFORNIA around edge of pan and NEVADA CITY in bottom of pan, crossed pick and shovel behind pan with silver rope wrapped around decorative handle, reverse marked Sterling, 4 3/8 in. long [Located in California's Sierra Nevada, Nevada City is the county seat of Nevada County, 60 miles northeast of Sacramento. Originally a mining camp founded along Deer Creek in 1849, Nevada City was known by many monikers through its history including Caldwell's Upper Store, Coyoteville, and Deer Creek Dry Diggings. The name Nevada was adopted in May 1850 at a public meeting, having derived its name after the Spanish word for snow. City was added later after Nevada became a state. After gold was discovered in Deer Creek, Nevada City rapidly became the largest and wealthiest mining town in California, with 10,000 residents and the third largest city in California at the time. During the period of 1848-1965, Nevada County produced the largest amount of gold in California at over $440 million. During the gold rush period, Nevada City was known for its coyote or drift diggings, while its sister town Grass Valley became the center for lode mining. Nevada City maintained a long history of gold mining operations with 16 major mines in the area. Mining in the area also changed the landscape dramatically. Hydraulic mining, where miners aimed high-pressure hydraulic monitors, like large water cannons, at the hillsides to strip away gravel in search of gold, was first practiced in California at American Hill here in 1852 by E. G. Matteson before environmental concerns stopped the practice in the 1880s.] Download Original Image
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