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Souvenir Mining Spoon Fernie BC
  Souvenir Mining Spoon  Fernie.JPG - SOUVENIR MINING SPOON FERNIE BC - Sterling silver souvenir spoon, 5 1/8 in. long, bowl embossed with miners with picks and an ore bucket and ladder, top of handle shows a miner with winch lowering the ore bucket on a ropedown the handle, marked on back of bowl with embossed FERNIE BC in a shield, reverse marked Sterling with maker’s mark [Fernie is a city in the Elk Valley area of the East Kootenay region of southeastern British Columbia, Canada, located on BC Highway 3 on the eastern approaches to the Crowsnest Pass through the Rocky Mountains. Founded in 1898 and incorporated as the city of Fernie in July 1904, the town owes its origins to the discovery of coal in the valley.  Fernie is named after William Fernie who, alongside Colonel James Baker, was the driving force behind the coal mines located here. Starting in 1887, for ten long years they struggled to raise the money necessary to build not only the mines but also the railway needed to transport the coal to the outside world. Finally, in 1897 Fernie founded the Crows Nest Pass Coal Company and established a temporary encampment near Coal Creek that would later be named Fernie. With the arrival of the Canadian Pacific Railroad in Fernie in 1898, the production of coal in the Elk Valley began in earnest and the new town of Fernie took shape opposite the CPR tracks. The construction of Fernie generated the development of sawmills, hardware stores, blacksmith shops and other suppliers. Fernie’s early history is one plagued by natural and human disasters. Fire reduced Fernie’s primarily wooden commercial district to smoldering rubble in April 1904. In August 1908 a second devastating fire gutted the entire city. The resulting reconstruction (in brick and stone instead of wood) dramatically transformed the city’s landscape. By 1910, Fernie’s businesses and their buildings were firmly established. They had expanded their stores and offices to serve a more diverse community of 6,000 people. The vast Crowsnest Coal Field lies just to the east of the city where Fernie is situated at the mouth of the Coal Creek valley.  The first underground coal mines were dug along the narrow Coal Creek valley.  No mining was ever carried out in Fernie proper; coking of Coal Creek coal was carried out at the townsite, but otherwise, the town developed into an administrative and commercial center for the burgeoning industry. While the mines at Coal Creek closed permanently by 1960, the focus of mining activity shifted about twenty-five kilometers upriver which sat on a more productive portion of the Crowsnest Coal Field. Kaiser Resources opened immense open-pit mines there in the 1970s to meet new coal contracts for the Asian industrial market.  Fernie would remain an important residential base for mine labor.  Today, Teck Resources operates all five open-pit mines, shipping out unit trains (often with more than 100 cars) along the Canadian Pacific Railway through Fernie to the Pacific Coast, where the coal is loaded onto freighters for overseas shipment.]  
Souvenir Mining Spoon Bowl Fernie BC
Souvenir Mining Spoon Handle Top Fernie BC
Souvenir Mining Spoon Bowl Marking Fernie BC
Souvenir Mining Spoon Reverse Fernie BC
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Souvenir Mining Spoon Fernie | SOUVENIR MINING SPOON FERNIE BC - Sterling silver souvenir spoon, 5 1/8 in. long, bowl embossed with miners with picks and an ore bucket and ladder, top of handle shows a miner with winch lowering the ore bucket on a rope down the handle, marked on back of bowl with embossed FERNIE BC in a shield, reverse marked Sterling with maker’s mark [Fernie is a city in the Elk Valley area of the East Kootenay region of southeastern British Columbia, Canada, located on BC Highway 3 on the eastern approaches to the Crowsnest Pass through the Rocky Mountains. Founded in 1898 and incorporated as the city of Fernie in July 1904, the town owes its origins to the discovery of coal in the valley. Fernie is named after William Fernie who, alongside Colonel James Baker, was the driving force behind the coal mines located here. Starting in 1887, for ten long years they struggled to raise the money necessary to build not only the mines but also the railway needed to transport the coal to the outside world. Finally, in 1897 Fernie founded the Crows Nest Pass Coal Company and established a temporary encampment near Coal Creek that would later be named Fernie. With the arrival of the Canadian Pacific Railroad in Fernie in 1898, the production of coal in the Elk Valley began in earnest and the new town of Fernie took shape opposite the CPR tracks. The construction of Fernie generated the development of sawmills, hardware stores, blacksmith shops and other suppliers. Fernie’s early history is one plagued by natural and human disasters. Fire reduced Fernie’s primarily wooden commercial district to smoldering rubble in April 1904. In August 1908 a second devastating fire gutted the entire city. The resulting reconstruction (in brick and stone instead of wood) dramatically transformed the city’s landscape. By 1910, Fernie’s businesses and their buildings were firmly established. They had expanded their stores and offices to serve a more diverse community of 6,000 people. The vast Crowsnest Coal Field lies just to the east of the city where Fernie is situated at the mouth of the Coal Creek valley. The first underground coal mines were dug along the narrow Coal Creek valley. No mining was ever carried out in Fernie proper; coking of Coal Creek coal was carried out at the townsite, but otherwise, the town developed into an administrative and commercial center for the burgeoning industry. While the mines at Coal Creek closed permanently by 1960, the focus of mining activity shifted about twenty-five kilometers upriver which sat on a more productive portion of the Crowsnest Coal Field. Kaiser Resources opened immense open-pit mines there in the 1970s to meet new coal contracts for the Asian industrial market. Fernie would remain an important residential base for mine labor. Today, Teck Resources operates all five open-pit mines, shipping out unit trains (often with more than 100 cars) along the Canadian Pacific Railway through Fernie to the Pacific Coast, where the coal is loaded onto freighters for overseas shipment.] Download Original Image
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