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Joplin ca 1907
Souvenir Mining Spoon Joplin, Missouri
Souvenir Mining Spoon Front Joplin, Missouri
Souvenir Mining Spoon Handle Joplin, Missouri
Souvenir Mining Spoon Bowl Joplin, Missouri
  Souvenir Mining Spoon Back Joplin, Missouri.JPG - SOUVENIR MINING SPOON JOPLIN MISSOURI - Sterling mining souvenir spoon with a skyline mining scene on handle that’s marked underneath  JOPLIN, MO, 5 5/16 in. long, bowl features an embossed view of six miners underground andan ore bucket attached to a rope that extends to the top of the handle, reverse of spoon is marked with the trademarks for Paye & Baker and "Sterling" along with anunidentified marking of Ball & Putman  [Joplin, a city in the southwestern corner of the state of Missouri, is the self-touted lead mining capital of the world.  Joplin was settled by the Reverend Harris G. Joplin in 1839.  Lead was discovered in the Joplin Creek Valley approximately two miles east of Joplin at Leadville in 1848. By 1851 the discovery led to the development of literally thousands of small mines. Early mining was oxidized ores, generally mined from ground surface to a depth of 75 feet. Lead was the primary metal recovered until 1872 when zinc became the dominant metal product. Before long, there were 17 zinc furnaces running around the clock. John C. Cox filed a town site plan for Joplin on the east side of the valley which was quickly populated by a number of new businesses and became incorporated in 1873. While Joplin was put on the map by lead, it was zinc that built the town. With the railroads passing through the area, Joplin was on the verge of dramatic growth. What began as a simple mining town was soon filled with smelters, mines, large homes, businesses, and the ever present saloons. In 1897, soaring prices and continued active demand produced large profits for mines in the Joplin District, and the following year was one of the most prosperous in the history of zinc mining. By the turn of the century Joplin with a population of 26,000 was quickly becoming the center of the mining activity for the prolific Tri-State Mining District, which consisted of Missouri, Kansas and Oklahoma.  Lead and zinc would sustain Joplin's economy for more than seven decades. During World War I, the mines thrived providing mineral materials for the war effort.  However, with the end of the war the Joplin mining industry started to decline.  The Missouri portion of the Tri-State District closed in 1957 and the entire district closed in 1970.  The value of Tri-State mineral production from 1850 to 1950 exceeded one billion dollars and until 1945, the region was rated as the leading producer of lead and zinc concentrates in the world, accounting for one-half of the zinc and 1/10 of the lead produced in the United States.  As a result of extensive surface and deep mining, Joplin today is dotted with open pit mines and mine shafts. The main part of Joplin is nearly 75% undermined, with some mine shafts well over 100 ft deep. These mine shafts have occasionally caved in, creating sink holes.]     
New England Mine ca 1900
Souvenir Mining Spoon New England Mine Fairmont, WV
Souvenir Mining Spoon Front New England Mine Fairmont, WV
Souvenir Mining Spoon Bowl New England Mine Fairmont, WV
Souvenir Mining Spoon Handle New England Mine Fairmont, WV

Souvenir Mining Spoon Back Joplin, Missouri | SOUVENIR MINING SPOON JOPLIN MISSOURI - Sterling mining souvenir spoon with a skyline mining scene on handle that’s marked underneath JOPLIN, MO, 5 5/16 in. long, bowl features an embossed view of six miners underground and an ore bucket attached to a rope that extends to the top of the handle, reverse of spoon is marked with the trademarks for Paye & Baker and "Sterling" along with an unidentified marking of Ball & Putman [Joplin, a city in the southwestern corner of the state of Missouri, is the self-touted lead mining capital of the world. Joplin was settled by the Reverend Harris G. Joplin in 1839. Lead was discovered in the Joplin Creek Valley approximately two miles east of Joplin at Leadville in 1848. By 1851 the discovery led to the development of literally thousands of small mines. Early mining was oxidized ores, generally mined from ground surface to a depth of 75 feet. Lead was the primary metal recovered until 1872 when zinc became the dominant metal product. Before long, there were 17 zinc furnaces running around the clock. John C. Cox filed a town site plan for Joplin on the east side of the valley which was quickly populated by a number of new businesses and became incorporated in 1873. While Joplin was put on the map by lead, it was zinc that built the town. With the railroads passing through the area, Joplin was on the verge of dramatic growth. What began as a simple mining town was soon filled with smelters, mines, large homes, businesses, and the ever present saloons. In 1897, soaring prices and continued active demand produced large profits for mines in the Joplin District, and the following year was one of the most prosperous in the history of zinc mining. By the turn of the century Joplin with a population of 26,000 was quickly becoming the center of the mining activity for the prolific Tri-State Mining District, which consisted of Missouri, Kansas and Oklahoma. Lead and zinc would sustain Joplin's economy for more than seven decades. During World War I, the mines thrived providing mineral materials for the war effort. However, with the end of the war the Joplin mining industry started to decline. The Missouri portion of the Tri-State District closed in 1957 and the entire district closed in 1970. The value of Tri-State mineral production from 1850 to 1950 exceeded one billion dollars and until 1945, the region was rated as the leading producer of lead and zinc concentrates in the world, accounting for one-half of the zinc and 1/10 of the lead produced in the United States. As a result of extensive surface and deep mining, Joplin today is dotted with open pit mines and mine shafts. The main part of Joplin is nearly 75% undermined, with some mine shafts well over 100 ft deep. These mine shafts have occasionally caved in, creating sink holes.] Download Original Image
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