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Souvenir Mining Spoon Trade Dollar Mill
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Bi-Metallic Mill Philipsburg MT 1890 Photo
  Souvenir Mining Spoon Bi-Metallic Mill Philipsburg MT.JPG - SOUVENIR MINING SPOON BI-METALLIC MILL PHILIPSBURG MT - Sterling silver souvenir demitasse spoon, 4 1/4 in. long, bowl engraved with mill buildings and marked BI-METALLIC MILL PHILIPSBURG MONT., handle marked in floral pattern, reverse marked Sterling with maker’s mark C.F.R.  [The historic mining town of Philipsburg, Montana is located about 55 miles northwest of Butte.  Founded in 1867 and named for Philip Deidesheimer of Comstock fame, the area around Philipsburg was home to the Granite Mountain and Bi-Metallic mines, major producers of the greatest silver bonanza at the time.  Both mines worked the same ore body first located in 1872.  In 1882 Charles McLure and  partners organized the Bi-Metallic Mining Company.  The company built the Bi-Metallic mill in 1888 along Douglas Creek about one mile southeast of Philipsburg in the small town known as Kirkland and later Clark.  The 50-stamp mill, 150 feet wide and 367 feet long, was rated at 75 tons with the capacity to add more stamps later.  At the time it was the largest stamp mill in Montana.  The town, which reached a peak population of about 125 people, was primarily inhabited by mill workers. It once included numerous cabins, a boarding house, company office, warehouse, and assay office, along with the large Bi-Metallic mill site. The mine and mill employed 500 workers. To get the ore to the mill, a tramway was constructed in 1889 from the mine to the Bi-Metallic mill, 9750 feet long with a vertical drop of 1225 feet, which was the longest aerial tramway in the United States at that time.  The mill was expanded to 100 stamps in 1891 giving it a 200-ton capacity. A huge 4,307 pound bar of silver bullion from the Bi-Metallic was displayed at the 1893 World's Fair.  From 1883 to 1893, the Bi-Metallic produced $6 million in silver and paid dividends of $2 million. Several years after the silver panic of 1893 the ownership of the Granite and Bi-Metallic was consolidated and years of intermittent company and leasing operations followed. . Operations ended in1918 as silver mining in the district gave way to manganese.  In 1967, the 367 feet long mill building was burned for safety reasons, but its two smokestacks and foundations continue to stand.]  
Souvenir Mining Spoon Bi-Metallic Mill
Souvenir Mining Spoon Bi-Metallic Mill Bowl
Souvenir Mining Spoon Bi-Metallic Mill Reverse
Mineral Springs Colliery Wilkes-Barre PA 1913 Photo
Souvenir Mining Spoon Wilkes-Barre PA

Souvenir Mining Spoon Bi-Metallic Mill Philipsburg MT | SOUVENIR MINING SPOON BI-METALLIC MILL PHILIPSBURG MT - Sterling silver souvenir demitasse spoon, 4 1/4 in. long, bowl engraved with mill buildings and marked BI-METALLIC MILL PHILIPSBURG MONT., handle marked in floral pattern, reverse marked Sterling with maker’s mark C.F.R. [The historic mining town of Philipsburg, Montana is located about 55 miles northwest of Butte. Founded in 1867 and named for Philip Deidesheimer of Comstock fame, the area around Philipsburg was home to the Granite Mountain and Bi-Metallic mines, major producers of the greatest silver bonanza at the time. Both mines worked the same ore body first located in 1872. In 1882 Charles McLure and partners organized the Bi-Metallic Mining Company. The company built the Bi-Metallic mill in 1888 along Douglas Creek about one mile southeast of Philipsburg in the small town known as Kirkland and later Clark. The 50-stamp mill, 150 feet wide and 367 feet long, was rated at 75 tons with the capacity to add more stamps later. At the time it was the largest stamp mill in Montana. The town, which reached a peak population of about 125 people, was primarily inhabited by mill workers. It once included numerous cabins, a boarding house, company office, warehouse, and assay office, along with the large Bi-Metallic mill site. The mine and mill employed 500 workers. To get the ore to the mill, a tramway was constructed in 1889 from the mine to the Bi-Metallic mill, 9750 feet long with a vertical drop of 1225 feet, which was the longest aerial tramway in the United States at that time. The mill was expanded to 100 stamps in 1891 giving it a 200-ton capacity. A huge 4,307 pound bar of silver bullion from the Bi-Metallic was displayed at the 1893 World's Fair. From 1883 to 1893, the Bi-Metallic produced $6 million in silver and paid dividends of $2 million. Several years after the silver panic of 1893 the ownership of the Granite and Bi-Metallic was consolidated and years of intermittent company and leasing operations followed. . Operations ended in1918 as silver mining in the district gave way to manganese. In 1967, the 367 feet long mill building was burned for safety reasons, but its two smokestacks and foundations continue to stand.] Download Original Image
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