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Souvenir Mining Spoon Leadville
Souvenir Mining Spoon Reverse Leadville CO
Davy No. 3 Mine Joplin
Souvenir Mining Spoon Davey No. 3 Mine Joplin MO
Souvenir Mining Spoon Davey No. 3 Mine
  Souvenir Mining Spoon Bowl Davey No. 3 Mine Joplin MO.JPG - SOUVENIR MINING SPOON, TRI-STATE MINING DISTRICT DAVEY NO. 3 MINE JOPLIN MO - Sterling silver spoon, 5 5/8 in. long, engraved mining scene of mine buildings in bowl, handle open design at top, bowl marked DAVEY NO. 3 MINE, JOPLIN MO. reverse marked with maker’s mark and Sterling, ca.1910  [The Davey No. 3 mine is typical of hundreds of lead and zinc mines located throughout the nearly 2500 square miles of the Tri-State Mining District. The Tri-State district was a historic lead-zinc mining district located in southwest Missouri, southeast Kansas and northeast Oklahoma. The Davey mines were operated by the American Lead, Zinc and Smelting Company with general offices in Boston, MA.  The company was incorporated on January 26, 1899 in Maine and by 1919 owned 2,160 acres of mineral land in the Joplin district and leased another 655 acres of land owned by the Davey family which included four Davey mines.  As of 1919, two of the mines were producing and two others were worked out.  The Tri-State Mining District produced lead and zinc for over 100 years. Production began in the 1850s and 1860s in the Joplin - Granby area of Jasper and Newton counties of southwest Missouri. By the turn of the century Joplin with a population of 26,000 was quickly becoming the center of the mining activity for the Tri-State Mining District. The value of Tri-State mineral production from 1850 to 1950 exceeded one billion dollars.  Until 1945, the region was rated as the leading producer of lead and zinc concentrates in the world, accounting for one-half of the zinc and ten percent of the lead produced in the United States. Production continued until the closure of the Picher, Oklahoma mines in 1967, and the Swalley mine near Baxter Springs, Kansas in 1970. The Tri-State district includes three mining-related Superfund sites: the Tar Creek Superfund site in Oklahoma; the Jasper County and Newton County sites in Missouri; and the Cherokee County site in Kansas.]  
Souvenir Mining Spoon Davey No. 3 Mine Reverse
Souvenir Mining Spoon Makers Mark Davey No. 3 Mine Joplin MO
Galena KS 1898 Photo
s-l1601
s-l1600

Souvenir Mining Spoon Bowl Davey No. 3 Mine Joplin MO | SOUVENIR MINING SPOON, TRI-STATE MINING DISTRICT DAVEY NO. 3 MINE JOPLIN MO - Sterling silver spoon, 5 5/8 in. long, engraved mining scene of mine buildings in bowl, handle open design at top, bowl marked DAVEY NO. 3 MINE, JOPLIN MO. reverse marked with maker’s mark and Sterling, ca.1910 [The Davey No. 3 mine is typical of hundreds of lead and zinc mines located throughout the nearly 2500 square miles of the Tri-State Mining District. The Tri-State district was a historic lead-zinc mining district located in southwest Missouri, southeast Kansas and northeast Oklahoma. The Davey mines were operated by the American Lead, Zinc and Smelting Company with general offices in Boston, MA. The company was incorporated on January 26, 1899 in Maine and by 1919 owned 2,160 acres of mineral land in the Joplin district and leased another 655 acres of land owned by the Davey family which included four Davey mines. As of 1919, two of the mines were producing and two others were worked out. The Tri-State Mining District produced lead and zinc for over 100 years. Production began in the 1850s and 1860s in the Joplin - Granby area of Jasper and Newton counties of southwest Missouri. By the turn of the century Joplin with a population of 26,000 was quickly becoming the center of the mining activity for the Tri-State Mining District. The value of Tri-State mineral production from 1850 to 1950 exceeded one billion dollars. Until 1945, the region was rated as the leading producer of lead and zinc concentrates in the world, accounting for one-half of the zinc and ten percent of the lead produced in the United States. Production continued until the closure of the Picher, Oklahoma mines in 1967, and the Swalley mine near Baxter Springs, Kansas in 1970. The Tri-State district includes three mining-related Superfund sites: the Tar Creek Superfund site in Oklahoma; the Jasper County and Newton County sites in Missouri; and the Cherokee County site in Kansas.] Download Original Image
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