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Souvenir Mining Spoon Bowl Anaconda Mine
Souvenir Mining Spoon Handle Anaconda Mine
Souvenir Mining Spoon Back Anaconda Mine
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Souvenir Mining Spoon C & C Shaft Virginia City, NV
  Souvenir Mining Spoon C & C Shaft Bowl Engraving.JPG - SOUVENIR MINING SPOON C & C SHAFT VIRGINIA CITY NV - Sterling silver spoon with engraved mining scene depicting the C & C Shaft at Virginia City, NV; the C & C Shaft was a joint effort of the California and Consolidated Virginia Mining Companies, bowl marked C & C SHAFT VIRGINIA, NEV. back marked Sterling, figural handle with double sided standing miner, gold pan with nuggets, and marking STRUCK IT RICH, length 4 1/4 in. and weight 15 g  [The C & C was the largest and most modern of all Comstock era shafts.  Located on the grounds of the California Mine, it was a joint property of the Consolidated Virginia and California Mining Companies.  The Consolidated Virginia Mining Company on the Comstock Lode at Virginia City, Nevada, was organized in 1867.  In 1871, James Flood began to buy stock in Consolidated Virginia and joined by fellow Irishmen John Mackay, James Fair, and William O'Brien, formed the Bonanza Firm. They bought the land owned by the Consolidated Virginia Mining Co. and hoped to find rich ore in that section between the Gould & Curry and the Ophir mines. In 1873, they struck the richest ore body in the Comstock Lode which became known as the Big Bonanza of the Consolidated Virginia and California Mine.  The Big Bonanza produced over $100 million of ore from 1873-1882.  The firm bought control of the adjoining Ophir and Mexican mines in 1877. Although the firm dominated the Comstock from 1876-95, when Mackay sold the interests to San Francisco stockbrokers, the last dividend was paid in 1880. The Con-Virginia was the most successful mine on the Comstock and one of the few to pay more in dividends than it levied in assessments. The C & C shaft was started in the mid-1870s and was part of a line of vertical shafts sunk in an attempt to tap the Comstock Lode at depths of 3,000 feet beneath the surface. Between 1876 and 1881 total production for the California Mine’s portion of the C&C was an estimated $44,031,000 from about 588,000 tons of ore for an average yield of almost $75.00 per ton. Total dividends paid on the C&C stock was about $31,320,000.  By 1882, the Bonanza Group of mines on the Comstock Lode had produced nearly 400 million dollars in ore, half the silver in the United States during that period. Though the ores of the Big Bonanza began to decline after 1878, it continued to produce ore until the 1940s.]  
Souvenir Mining Spoon C & C Shaft Front Side
Souvenir Mining Spoon C & C Shaft Reverse Side
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Souvenir Mining Spoon Northport, WA
Souvenir Mining Spoon Smelter Northport, WA

Souvenir Mining Spoon C & C Shaft Bowl Engraving | SOUVENIR MINING SPOON C & C SHAFT VIRGINIA CITY NV - Sterling silver spoon with engraved mining scene depicting the C & C Shaft at Virginia City, NV; the C & C Shaft was a joint effort of the California and Consolidated Virginia Mining Companies, bowl marked C & C SHAFT VIRGINIA, NEV. back marked Sterling, figural handle with double sided standing miner, gold pan with nuggets, and marking STRUCK IT RICH, length 4 1/4 in. and weight 15 g [The C & C was the largest and most modern of all Comstock era shafts. Located on the grounds of the California Mine, it was a joint property of the Consolidated Virginia and California Mining Companies. The Consolidated Virginia Mining Company on the Comstock Lode at Virginia City, Nevada, was organized in 1867. In 1871, James Flood began to buy stock in Consolidated Virginia and joined by fellow Irishmen John Mackay, James Fair, and William O'Brien, formed the Bonanza Firm. They bought the land owned by the Consolidated Virginia Mining Co. and hoped to find rich ore in that section between the Gould & Curry and the Ophir mines. In 1873, they struck the richest ore body in the Comstock Lode which became known as the Big Bonanza of the Consolidated Virginia and California Mine. The Big Bonanza produced over $100 million of ore from 1873-1882. The firm bought control of the adjoining Ophir and Mexican mines in 1877. Although the firm dominated the Comstock from 1876-95, when Mackay sold the interests to San Francisco stockbrokers, the last dividend was paid in 1880. The Con-Virginia was the most successful mine on the Comstock and one of the few to pay more in dividends than it levied in assessments. The C & C shaft was started in the mid-1870s and was part of a line of vertical shafts sunk in an attempt to tap the Comstock Lode at depths of 3,000 feet beneath the surface. Between 1876 and 1881 total production for the California Mine’s portion of the C&C was an estimated $44,031,000 from about 588,000 tons of ore for an average yield of almost $75.00 per ton. Total dividends paid on the C&C stock was about $31,320,000. By 1882, the Bonanza Group of mines on the Comstock Lode had produced nearly 400 million dollars in ore, half the silver in the United States during that period. Though the ores of the Big Bonanza began to decline after 1878, it continued to produce ore until the 1940s.] Download Original Image
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