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Souvenir Mining Spoon Calumet Hecla Mine Calumet MI
  Souvenir Mining Spoon Calumet Hecla Mine Front.JPG - SOUVENIR MINING SPOON CALUMET & HECLA SHAFT NO 2 CALUMET MICHIGAN - Sterling souvenir mining spoon, 5 1/2 in. long, embossed mining scene in bowl, marked CALUMET & HECLA SHAFT NO. 2, CALUMET, MICH., handle with MI state seal at top and miner with pick, marked MICHIGAN, reverse shows designs of teepee and canoe with Sterling stamping and makers mark, ex-John Rascona collection [In 1864, Edwin J. Hulbert discovered a copper-bearing section of what became known as the Calumet Conglomerate in Houghton County, Michigan. Hulbert formed the Calumet Company in 1865, with Boston investors. The company spun off the Hecla Company the following year, and assigned shares in the new company to Calumet shareholders.  Hulbert was a major shareholder in both companies, and was in charge of mine operations. But despite the rich ore, Hulbert did not have the practical knowledge to dig out the ore, crush it, and concentrate it. Frustrated with Hulbert’s lack of success, the company sent Alexander Agassiz to run the mine.  Under Agassiz’ expert management, the Hecla Company paid its first dividend in 1868, and the Calumet Company began paying dividends in 1869. The two companies merged in May 1871 to form the Calumet & Hecla Mining Company, with Quincy Adams Shaw as its first president. In August of that year, Shaw retired to the board of directors and Agassiz became president, a position he held until his death. The town of Red Jacket (now named Calumet) formed next to the mine.  Calumet and Hecla built itself into a copper mining colossus. From 1868 through 1886, it was the leading copper producer in the United States, and from 1869 through 1876, the leading copper producer in the world.  From 1871 through 1880, Calumet and Hecla turned out more than half the copper produced in the United States. In each year save one between 1870 and 1901, Calumet and Hecla made most of the copper produced in the Michigan copper district.  By 1901 the underground mining complex had 16 shafts. Annual copper production from the mines peaked in 1906 at 100 million pounds then declined to 67 million pounds by 1912 in response to lower prices.  Copper prices fell drastically after WW I and the company shut down mining on the Calumet conglomerate in April 1921.  Copper production rebounded in 1922, and rose steadily through the 1920s. Calumet and Hecla grew in the 1920s by buying and merging with neighboring copper mines. In 1923, Calumet and Hecla merged with the Ahmeek, Allouez, and Centennial mining companies. The combined entity was renamed the Calumet and Hecla Consolidated Copper Company. The merged company essentially controlled all the operating copper mines north of Hancock, Michigan.  During the Great Depression, copper prices dropped, and as a result most copper mines in the Copper Country closed, including Calumet and Hecla. Following WW II, the company resumed operations but was unable to produce enough copper for its internal uses. Universal Oil Products bought Calumet and Hecla in April 1968. The company shut down the dewatering pumps in 1970 and the mines have remained idle ever since, and most are permanently capped.  Today, many Calumet and Hecla company mines and buildings are part of Keweenaw National Historical Park.]  
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Souvenir Mining Spoon Calumet Hecla Mine Front | SOUVENIR MINING SPOON CALUMET & HECLA SHAFT NO 2 CALUMET MICHIGAN - Sterling souvenir mining spoon, 5 1/2 in. long, embossed mining scene in bowl, marked CALUMET & HECLA SHAFT NO. 2, CALUMET, MICH., handle with MI state seal at top and miner with pick, marked MICHIGAN, reverse shows designs of teepee and canoe with Sterling stamping and makers mark, ex-John Rascona collection [In 1864, Edwin J. Hulbert discovered a copper-bearing section of what became known as the Calumet Conglomerate in Houghton County, Michigan. Hulbert formed the Calumet Company in 1865, with Boston investors. The company spun off the Hecla Company the following year, and assigned shares in the new company to Calumet shareholders. Hulbert was a major shareholder in both companies, and was in charge of mine operations. But despite the rich ore, Hulbert did not have the practical knowledge to dig out the ore, crush it, and concentrate it. Frustrated with Hulbert’s lack of success, the company sent Alexander Agassiz to run the mine. Under Agassiz’ expert management, the Hecla Company paid its first dividend in 1868, and the Calumet Company began paying dividends in 1869. The two companies merged in May 1871 to form the Calumet & Hecla Mining Company, with Quincy Adams Shaw as its first president. In August of that year, Shaw retired to the board of directors and Agassiz became president, a position he held until his death. The town of Red Jacket (now named Calumet) formed next to the mine. Calumet and Hecla built itself into a copper mining colossus. From 1868 through 1886, it was the leading copper producer in the United States, and from 1869 through 1876, the leading copper producer in the world. From 1871 through 1880, Calumet and Hecla turned out more than half the copper produced in the United States. In each year save one between 1870 and 1901, Calumet and Hecla made most of the copper produced in the Michigan copper district. By 1901 the underground mining complex had 16 shafts. Annual copper production from the mines peaked in 1906 at 100 million pounds then declined to 67 million pounds by 1912 in response to lower prices. Copper prices fell drastically after WW I and the company shut down mining on the Calumet conglomerate in April 1921. Copper production rebounded in 1922, and rose steadily through the 1920s. Calumet and Hecla grew in the 1920s by buying and merging with neighboring copper mines. In 1923, Calumet and Hecla merged with the Ahmeek, Allouez, and Centennial mining companies. The combined entity was renamed the Calumet and Hecla Consolidated Copper Company. The merged company essentially controlled all the operating copper mines north of Hancock, Michigan. During the Great Depression, copper prices dropped, and as a result most copper mines in the Copper Country closed, including Calumet and Hecla. Following WW II, the company resumed operations but was unable to produce enough copper for its internal uses. Universal Oil Products bought Calumet and Hecla in April 1968. The company shut down the dewatering pumps in 1970 and the mines have remained idle ever since, and most are permanently capped. Today, many Calumet and Hecla company mines and buildings are part of Keweenaw National Historical Park.] Download Original Image
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