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Bunker Hill Mine
Souvenir Mining Spoon Bunker Hill Mine
Souvenir Mining Spoon Bunker Hill Mine Closeup
Few More Souvenir Mining Spoons
Parrot Colusa Mine, Butte, MT (ca 1900)
  Souvenir Mining Spoon Colusa Parrot Mine.JPG - SOUVENIR MINING SPOON COLUSA PARROT MINE - Sterling silver spoon, 5 1/2 in.long, embossed mining scene in light gilt bowl with engraved COLUSA PARROT MINE BUTTE, MONT in bowl, weight 25 gms., ca. 1900, back with sterling and S hallmark markings, made by the Shepard Mfg. Co., back side shows lady holdingcrest and front side handle has MONTANA and miner with pick, top marked Oro y Plata (silver and gold)  [The Colusa-Parrot mine was the most productive of the mining properties owned by William A. Clark, the first of Butte’s Copper Kings.  In 1872, William A. Clark, a banker from the nearby town of Deer Lodge, visited the Butte district and examined some claims on the large black quartz reefs located just below the big butte overlooking the camp. Clark purchased four properties within the quartz-rich zone: the Original, the Colusa, the Mountain Chief, and the Gambetta claims. These four claims, together with his Travona silver mine, would launch Clark's career.  On Nov. 26, 1897 Clark organized the Colusa-Parrot Mining & Smelting Co.  With a main office at 10 W. Broadway St. in Butte, the company was a close corporation.  It was thought that Clark controlled all the stock in the company and none was ever traded on the open market.  The company operated the Original, Stewart and Colusa-Parrot mines along with a smelter.  The Colusa-Parrot mine had a two-compartment shaft 1400 feet deep with underground connections to the Parrot and Never Sweat mines operated by the Anaconda Copper Mining Co.  The mineral surface area of the Colusa-Parrot mine was a small 150 by 298 feet.  The mine produced low grade ore with large veins and employed 500-600 men at full employment.  Annual production in 1902 was 10-15 million pounds of refined copper.  The Colusa-Parrot mine became the source of a simmering litigation between Clark and Anaconda.  In May 1910, Clark sold his major copper properties including the Butte Reduction Works, Original Consolidated mine, the Montana Realty Co. and the Colusa-Parrot mine to the Anaconda Copper Mining Co. for $5M thus ending a long and tumultuous relationship with Anaconda. Clark served as a senator from Montana for a number of years and died in March 1925.]    
Souvenir Mining Spoon Bowl Colusa Parrot Mine
Cross Shaft, Angels Camp, CA
Souvenir Mining Spoon Cross Shaft
Souvenir Mining Spoon Bowl Cross Shaft
Homestake Mine, Lead, SD (ca 1900)

Souvenir Mining Spoon Colusa Parrot Mine | SOUVENIR MINING SPOON COLUSA PARROT MINE - Sterling silver spoon, 5 1/2 in. long, embossed mining scene in light gilt bowl with engraved COLUSA PARROT MINE BUTTE, MONT in bowl, weight 25 gms., ca. 1900, back with sterling and S hallmark markings, made by the Shepard Mfg. Co., back side shows lady holding crest and front side handle has MONTANA and miner with pick, top marked Oro y Plata (silver and gold) [The Colusa-Parrot mine was the most productive of the mining properties owned by William A. Clark, the first of Butte’s Copper Kings. In 1872, William A. Clark, a banker from the nearby town of Deer Lodge, visited the Butte district and examined some claims on the large black quartz reefs located just below the big butte overlooking the camp. Clark purchased four properties within the quartz-rich zone: the Original, the Colusa, the Mountain Chief, and the Gambetta claims. These four claims, together with his Travona silver mine, would launch Clark's career. On Nov. 26, 1897 Clark organized the Colusa-Parrot Mining & Smelting Co. With a main office at 10 W. Broadway St. in Butte, the company was a close corporation. It was thought that Clark controlled all the stock in the company and none was ever traded on the open market. The company operated the Original, Stewart and Colusa-Parrot mines along with a smelter. The Colusa-Parrot mine had a two-compartment shaft 1400 feet deep with underground connections to the Parrot and Never Sweat mines operated by the Anaconda Copper Mining Co. The mineral surface area of the Colusa-Parrot mine was a small 150 by 298 feet. The mine produced low grade ore with large veins and employed 500-600 men at full employment. Annual production in 1902 was 10-15 million pounds of refined copper. The Colusa-Parrot mine became the source of a simmering litigation between Clark and Anaconda. In May 1910, Clark sold his major copper properties including the Butte Reduction Works, Original Consolidated mine, the Montana Realty Co. and the Colusa-Parrot mine to the Anaconda Copper Mining Co. for $5M thus ending a long and tumultuous relationship with Anaconda. Clark served as a senator from Montana for a number of years and died in March 1925.] Download Original Image
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