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Few More Souvenir Mining Spoons
Parrot Colusa Mine, Butte, MT (ca 1900)
Souvenir Mining Spoon Colusa Parrot Mine
Souvenir Mining Spoon Bowl Colusa Parrot Mine
Cross Shaft, Angels Camp, CA
  Souvenir Mining Spoon Cross Shaft.JPG - SOUVENIR MINING SPOON CROSS SHAFT UTICA MINE - Sterling silver spoon, 5 1/8 in. long, embossed mining scene in bowl with engraved CROSS SHAFT, ANGELS CAMP, CAL. in bowl, ca. 1900, back with sterling marking, handle has gold pan with crossed pick and shovel at top and a silver rope extending from a bucket ontop and wrapped around handle shaft  [The Utica Mine, one on the best-known gold mines in the Mother Lode, is located within the city of Angels Camp in southwestern Calaveras County, California. The gold mines in and around Angels Camp are part of the Angels Camp mining district, which is credited with producing at least $30 million in gold. The Utica Mine alone is thought to have produced in excess of $17 million at the old price of gold and during the 1890s, the Utica Mine was one of the most productive in the nation. The surface of the Utica claim was mined during the early part of the gold rush, but large-scale development was only conducted between 1893 and 1915 by the Utica Gold Mining Company.  In the 1880s Charles D. Lane gained control of the Utica claim and along with partners Walter Hobart and Alvinza Hayward, organized the Utica Mining Company and started large scale development in 1893. The other claims that now constitute the Utica Mine (Brown, Confidence, Dead Horse, Jackson, Little Nugget, Raspberry, Stickle, and Washington claims) were gradually acquired and the mine was developed on a major scale with more than 500 men on the payroll.  In 1896, the Cross shaft was sunk in hard rock to provide a permanent opening for the mine.  By 1900, the Cross vertical shaft bottomed at 1312 feet.  Details of mine workings are sketchy, but there are thought to be over 100 miles of underground workings.  Operations continued into late 1915 when the mine was shut down.  Except for mill cleanups and small amounts of gold recovered from the dump in the 1930s, the mine has been idle since.]  
Souvenir Mining Spoon Bowl Cross Shaft
Homestake Mine, Lead, SD (ca 1900)
Souvenir Mining Spoon Lead SD
Souvenir Mining Spoon Bowl Lead SD
More Mining Spoons

Souvenir Mining Spoon Cross Shaft | SOUVENIR MINING SPOON CROSS SHAFT UTICA MINE - Sterling silver spoon, 5 1/8 in. long, embossed mining scene in bowl with engraved CROSS SHAFT, ANGELS CAMP, CAL. in bowl, ca. 1900, back with sterling marking, handle has gold pan with crossed pick and shovel at top and a silver rope extending from a bucket on top and wrapped around handle shaft [The Utica Mine, one on the best-known gold mines in the Mother Lode, is located within the city of Angels Camp in southwestern Calaveras County, California. The gold mines in and around Angels Camp are part of the Angels Camp mining district, which is credited with producing at least $30 million in gold. The Utica Mine alone is thought to have produced in excess of $17 million at the old price of gold and during the 1890s, the Utica Mine was one of the most productive in the nation. The surface of the Utica claim was mined during the early part of the gold rush, but large-scale development was only conducted between 1893 and 1915 by the Utica Gold Mining Company. In the 1880s Charles D. Lane gained control of the Utica claim and along with partners Walter Hobart and Alvinza Hayward, organized the Utica Mining Company and started large scale development in 1893. The other claims that now constitute the Utica Mine (Brown, Confidence, Dead Horse, Jackson, Little Nugget, Raspberry, Stickle, and Washington claims) were gradually acquired and the mine was developed on a major scale with more than 500 men on the payroll. In 1896, the Cross shaft was sunk in hard rock to provide a permanent opening for the mine. By 1900, the Cross vertical shaft bottomed at 1312 feet. Details of mine workings are sketchy, but there are thought to be over 100 miles of underground workings. Operations continued into late 1915 when the mine was shut down. Except for mill cleanups and small amounts of gold recovered from the dump in the 1930s, the mine has been idle since.] Download Original Image
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