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De Smet Mill
Souvenir Mining Spoon De Smet Mill & Mine Central City SD
  Souvenir Mining Spoon Front De Smet Mill & Mine Central City SD.JPG - SOUVENIR MINING SPOON DE SMET MILL & MINE CENTRAL CITY SD - Sterling silver souvenir spoon, gold washed bowl engraved with mining scene and buildings and marked DE SMET MILL & MINE, CENTRAL CITY BLACK HILLS, front of handle shows detailed images of state seal with banner reading UNDER GOD THE PEOPLE RULE, below with man working soil with plow pulled by horse, ship and mountains in background and SOUTH DAKOTA down the wavy handle, 5 1/2 inch long, back marked STERLING and maker’s mark of Wendell Manufacturing  Co. and stamped EDHOLM & AKIN, ca 1890s, the Wendell Mfg. Co. of Chicago started out as a manufacturer of silver badges. Founded by Charles Wendell, it was incorporated in 1889. They made flatware and even had a contract to provide sterling ware to Marshall Field & Co.  The flatware line was discontinued in 1900. The firm of Edholm & Akin owned jewelry stores in Omaha during the 1880s and in Deadwood during the 1890s.  In 1904 N. J. Edholm and Arthur M. Akin opened a store in Evanston.  Akin died on Sept. 28, 1914.  He and Edholm were in business together for nearly 30 years. [The Father De Smet and its better-known neighbor Homestake were extremely rich gold claims in the Dakota Territory of the late 1870s.  The Father De Smet Mine was discovered in May 1876.  Named for the Belgian Jesuit Indian missionary Father Pierre Jean De Smet who visited the Black Hills during the mid-1800s, it was owned by Californians Archie Borland, August Hemme, L. R. Graves and A. J. Bowie who paid the highest price paid for any claim or set of claims in the Black Hills.  The De Smet was located on the northern end of the Great Belt, a mammoth lode of several miles in length situated between and extending from the vicinity of Central City on the north trending south to Lead City. The vein is of enormous width from forty to over one hundred and fifty feet in various places and continuous in length. Many of the great mines of the Black Hills were mostly on this Great Belt.  Proceeding north to south along the Great Belt were the Father De Smet, Deadwood, Golden Terra, Highland and Homestake Mines. At the time, the vein of ore showing up in the De Smet through to the Homestake, a distance of one and one-fourth miles, was the largest vein of ore yet found in the world, when its great width is taken into consideration.  By 1878 the Father De Smet Mining and Milling Company had installed a 100-stamp mill and was by far the most important mining company in Central City.  Almost as soon as the Homestake Mining Company was organized, the new principal owner, George Hearst of California, sought to gain control of the productive mines of the Great Belt.  He successfully bought out all but the De Smet property.  Hearst had said that the De Smet "is the greatest gold mine yet discovered in the world.  The De Smet pay streak is over 400 feet wide.”  However Archie Borland refused to sell.  The two companies became bitter rivals.  By 1881, Hearst had bought up enough stock of the De Smet Mining and Milling Company to take controlling interest.  What history has referred to as the Homestake Mine is in reality these major mines along the Great Belt.  The De Smet, renamed Mineral Point by Homestake, ceased operations in October 1918.]  
Souvenir Mining Spoon Bowl De Smet Mill & Mine Central City SD
Souvenir Mining Spoon Back De Smet Mill & Mine Central City SD
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Souvenir Mining Spoon Gold Coin Mine Victor CO
Souvenir Mining Spoon Front Gold Coin Mine Victor CO

Souvenir Mining Spoon Front De Smet Mill & Mine Central City SD | SOUVENIR MINING SPOON DE SMET MILL & MINE CENTRAL CITY SD - Sterling silver souvenir spoon, gold washed bowl engraved with mining scene and buildings and marked DE SMET MILL & MINE, CENTRAL CITY BLACK HILLS, front of handle shows detailed images of state seal with banner reading UNDER GOD THE PEOPLE RULE, below with man working soil with plow pulled by horse, ship and mountains in background and SOUTH DAKOTA down the wavy handle, 5 1/2 inch long, back marked STERLING and maker’s mark of Wendell Manufacturing Co. and stamped EDHOLM & AKIN, ca 1890s, the Wendell Mfg. Co. of Chicago started out as a manufacturer of silver badges. Founded by Charles Wendell, it was incorporated in 1889. They made flatware and even had a contract to provide sterling ware to Marshall Field & Co. The flatware line was discontinued in 1900. The firm of Edholm & Akin owned jewelry stores in Omaha during the 1880s and in Deadwood during the 1890s. In 1904 N. J. Edholm and Arthur M. Akin opened a store in Evanston. Akin died on Sept. 28, 1914. He and Edholm were in business together for nearly 30 years. [The Father De Smet and its better-known neighbor Homestake were extremely rich gold claims in the Dakota Territory of the late 1870s. The Father De Smet Mine was discovered in May 1876. Named for the Belgian Jesuit Indian missionary Father Pierre Jean De Smet who visited the Black Hills during the mid-1800s, it was owned by Californians Archie Borland, August Hemme, L. R. Graves and A. J. Bowie who paid the highest price paid for any claim or set of claims in the Black Hills. The De Smet was located on the northern end of the Great Belt, a mammoth lode of several miles in length situated between and extending from the vicinity of Central City on the north trending south to Lead City. The vein is of enormous width from forty to over one hundred and fifty feet in various places and continuous in length. Many of the great mines of the Black Hills were mostly on this Great Belt. Proceeding north to south along the Great Belt were the Father De Smet, Deadwood, Golden Terra, Highland and Homestake Mines. At the time, the vein of ore showing up in the De Smet through to the Homestake, a distance of one and one-fourth miles, was the largest vein of ore yet found in the world, when its great width is taken into consideration. By 1878 the Father De Smet Mining and Milling Company had installed a 100-stamp mill and was by far the most important mining company in Central City. Almost as soon as the Homestake Mining Company was organized, the new principal owner, George Hearst of California, sought to gain control of the productive mines of the Great Belt. He successfully bought out all but the De Smet property. Hearst had said that the De Smet "is the greatest gold mine yet discovered in the world. The De Smet pay streak is over 400 feet wide.” However Archie Borland refused to sell. The two companies became bitter rivals. By 1881, Hearst had bought up enough stock of the De Smet Mining and Milling Company to take controlling interest. What history has referred to as the Homestake Mine is in reality these major mines along the Great Belt. The De Smet, renamed Mineral Point by Homestake, ceased operations in October 1918.] Download Original Image
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