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Souvenir Mining Spoon Prescott AZ Reverse
Granby Smelter Grand Forks BC ca 1905
Souvenir Mining Spoon Granby Smelter Grand Forks BC
Souvenir Mining Spoon Granby Smelter
Souvenir Mining Spoon Granby Smelter Bowl
  Souvenir Mining Spoon Granby Smelter BC Crest on Handle.JPG - SOUVENIR MINING SPOON GRANBY SMELTER GRAND FORKS BC - Sterling silver souvenir demitasse spoon, features handle with enamel BC crest at top, bowl embossed with detailed scene of the Granby Smelter and marked GRANBY SMELTER GRAND FORKS, B.C., length 4 in., marked on reverse Sterling with registered design RD 1901, weight13.8 gms. [The Granby Smelter was constructed in 1900 by the Granby Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company at Grand Forks, British Columbia.  Grand Forks is a city in the Boundary Country of the West Kootenay region of British Columbia. It is located at the confluence of the Granby River and Kettle River, a tributary of the Columbia. The city is just north of the US-Canada border. Grand Forks was established in the late 19th century when copper mining dominated Boundary and Kootenay regions of BC. The city was laid out in 1895 and Grand Forks was officially established as a city on 15 April 1897. The Phoenix Mine was an open pit and underground copper mining operation near the town of Grand Forks.  It was a lower grade copper deposit that was discovered in 1891.  In 1896, J.F.C. Miner, a rubber footwear manufacturer from Granby, Quebec, and mining promoters J. P. Graves and A. L. Little formed the Miner-Graves Syndicate and purchased the Phoenix Mine. In 1899, they incorporated The Granby Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company and, in 1901, consolidated as Granby Consolidated Mining, Smelting and Power Company. In spite of the low grade of the ore from the Phoenix deposit, it had the advantage of being self-fluxing (only requiring coke to be added for smelting), which resulted in a cheaper processing cost. In 1896 development of the deposit began and in 1900 the Granby Smelter Company completed the 700-ton-per-day smelter in Grand Forks which would at the time be the largest non-ferrous smelter in the British Empire and the second largest in the world.  Ore was transported to the smelter via the Canadian Pacific Railway, which had built a line to the mining operation.  By 1910 the smelter had undergone several expansions whereby it employed 300 men and processed 3000 tons of ore per day.  With the dramatic drop in world copper prices in 1919, the smelter and Phoenix mine closed.  The slag piles on the Granby River just outside town are all that remains today of this large copper smelting operation.]  
Souvenir Mining Spoon Granby Smelter Reverse
1910 Mizpah Mine Tonopah NV - Copy
Souvenir Mining Spoon Mizpah Mine Tonopah NV
Souvenir Mining Spoon Mizpah Mine Bowl
Souvenir Mining Spoon Mizpah Mine

Souvenir Mining Spoon Granby Smelter BC Crest on Handle | SOUVENIR MINING SPOON GRANBY SMELTER GRAND FORKS BC - Sterling silver souvenir demitasse spoon, features handle with enamel BC crest at top, bowl embossed with detailed scene of the Granby Smelter and marked GRANBY SMELTER GRAND FORKS, B.C., length 4 in., marked on reverse Sterling with registered design RD 1901, weight13.8 gms. [The Granby Smelter was constructed in 1900 by the Granby Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company at Grand Forks, British Columbia. Grand Forks is a city in the Boundary Country of the West Kootenay region of British Columbia. It is located at the confluence of the Granby River and Kettle River, a tributary of the Columbia. The city is just north of the US-Canada border. Grand Forks was established in the late 19th century when copper mining dominated Boundary and Kootenay regions of BC. The city was laid out in 1895 and Grand Forks was officially established as a city on 15 April 1897. The Phoenix Mine was an open pit and underground copper mining operation near the town of Grand Forks. It was a lower grade copper deposit that was discovered in 1891. In 1896, J.F.C. Miner, a rubber footwear manufacturer from Granby, Quebec, and mining promoters J. P. Graves and A. L. Little formed the Miner-Graves Syndicate and purchased the Phoenix Mine. In 1899, they incorporated The Granby Consolidated Mining and Smelting Company and, in 1901, consolidated as Granby Consolidated Mining, Smelting and Power Company. In spite of the low grade of the ore from the Phoenix deposit, it had the advantage of being self-fluxing (only requiring coke to be added for smelting), which resulted in a cheaper processing cost. In 1896 development of the deposit began and in 1900 the Granby Smelter Company completed the 700-ton-per-day smelter in Grand Forks which would at the time be the largest non-ferrous smelter in the British Empire and the second largest in the world. Ore was transported to the smelter via the Canadian Pacific Railway, which had built a line to the mining operation. By 1910 the smelter had undergone several expansions whereby it employed 300 men and processed 3000 tons of ore per day. With the dramatic drop in world copper prices in 1919, the smelter and Phoenix mine closed. The slag piles on the Granby River just outside town are all that remains today of this large copper smelting operation.] Download Original Image
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