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Souvenir Mining Spoon Back Gold Coin Mine Victor CO
DEADWOOD DAKOTA TERRITORY PHOTO 1876
Souvenir Mining Spoon Deadwood SD
Souvenir Mining Spoon Front Deadwood SD
Souvenir Mining Spoon Bowl Deadwood SD
  Souvenir Mining Spoon Handle Deadwood SD.JPG - SOUVENIR MINING SPOON DEADWOOD SD - Sterling silver spoon with engraved bowl showing miner panning for gold and marked DEADWOOD S.D., figuralhandle with gold pan, pick, shovel and ore bucket on top with rope wrappingthe top of handle, 5 3/8 in. long, reverse marked Sterling with CB&H hallmark for Codding Brothers & Heilbron, North Attleboro, MA who made sterling flatware from 1879-1918, Heilbron became a partner in 1891 [Deadwood, South Dakota was established in 1876 during the Black Hills gold rush. The settlement of Deadwood began illegally on land which had been granted to the Lakota-Sioux.  In 1875, a miner named John B. Pearson found gold in a narrow canyon in the Northern Black Hills. This canyon became known as "Deadwood Gulch," because of the many dead trees that lined the canyon walls at the time. The name stuck.  Today Deadwood has a population of 1270 residents and serves as the county seat of Lawrence County.  In 1874 a government- sponsored expedition confirmed the presence of gold in the Black Hills. The U.S. government tried to conceal the discovery from the general public in order to honor the 1868 Treaty of Fort Laramie, which forever ceded the Black Hills to the Lakota-Sioux. Despite the efforts of the military and federal government, the American populace learned about the discovery of gold in the Black Hills. Influenced by dreams and greed, the 1876 gold rush was on in the Black Hills. Once Deadwood was established, the mining camp was soon swarming with thousands of prospectors searching for an easy way to get rich. Most of the early population was in Deadwood to mine for gold, but the lawless region naturally attracted a crowd of rough and shady characters. These particular individuals made the early days of Deadwood rough and wild. A mostly male population eagerly patronized the many saloons, gambling establishments, dance halls, and brothels. By late 1877, Deadwood was moving from a primitive mining camp to a community with a town government, wood and brick buildings, and a sense of law and order. As the economy changed from gold panning to deep mining, Deadwood lost its rough and rowdy character. The town survived two devastating fires, one in 1879 and another in 1894, each time to rebuild.  In 1890, the Fremont, Elkhorn, and Missouri Valley Railroad connected the town to the outside world.  With the railroad, Deadwood evolved into a prosperous commercial center primarily focused on its gold mining industry.  South Dakota entered statehood on November 2, 1889 and Deadwood became the place where people traveled in the Black Hills to conduct their business, settling into the twentieth century.  Deadwood became the only city in the United States to be named a National Historic Landmark in 1964. A state initiative authorized legalized gaming in Deadwood to start on November 1, 1989. The introduction of gaming has enabled Deadwood to preserve its historic buildings and dramatically increase tourism. The lure of gaming is not the only draw to Deadwood; people are also fascinated by its unique, colorful history.]  
Souvenir Mining Spoon Back Deadwood SD
$_57
Souvenir Mining Spoon Ellison Hoist
Souvenir Mining Spoon Ellison Hoist Lead SD
Souvenir Mining Spoon Bowl Ellison Hoist Lead SD

Souvenir Mining Spoon Handle Deadwood SD | SOUVENIR MINING SPOON DEADWOOD SD - Sterling silver spoon with engraved bowl showing miner panning for gold and marked DEADWOOD S.D., figural handle with gold pan, pick, shovel and ore bucket on top with rope wrapping the top of handle, 5 3/8 in. long, reverse marked Sterling with CB&H hallmark for Codding Brothers & Heilbron, North Attleboro, MA who made sterling flatware from 1879-1918, Heilbron became a partner in 1891 [Deadwood, South Dakota was established in 1876 during the Black Hills gold rush. The settlement of Deadwood began illegally on land which had been granted to the Lakota-Sioux. In 1875, a miner named John B. Pearson found gold in a narrow canyon in the Northern Black Hills. This canyon became known as "Deadwood Gulch," because of the many dead trees that lined the canyon walls at the time. The name stuck. Today Deadwood has a population of 1270 residents and serves as the county seat of Lawrence County. In 1874 a government- sponsored expedition confirmed the presence of gold in the Black Hills. The U.S. government tried to conceal the discovery from the general public in order to honor the 1868 Treaty of Fort Laramie, which forever ceded the Black Hills to the Lakota-Sioux. Despite the efforts of the military and federal government, the American populace learned about the discovery of gold in the Black Hills. Influenced by dreams and greed, the 1876 gold rush was on in the Black Hills. Once Deadwood was established, the mining camp was soon swarming with thousands of prospectors searching for an easy way to get rich. Most of the early population was in Deadwood to mine for gold, but the lawless region naturally attracted a crowd of rough and shady characters. These particular individuals made the early days of Deadwood rough and wild. A mostly male population eagerly patronized the many saloons, gambling establishments, dance halls, and brothels. By late 1877, Deadwood was moving from a primitive mining camp to a community with a town government, wood and brick buildings, and a sense of law and order. As the economy changed from gold panning to deep mining, Deadwood lost its rough and rowdy character. The town survived two devastating fires, one in 1879 and another in 1894, each time to rebuild. In 1890, the Fremont, Elkhorn, and Missouri Valley Railroad connected the town to the outside world. With the railroad, Deadwood evolved into a prosperous commercial center primarily focused on its gold mining industry. South Dakota entered statehood on November 2, 1889 and Deadwood became the place where people traveled in the Black Hills to conduct their business, settling into the twentieth century. Deadwood became the only city in the United States to be named a National Historic Landmark in 1964. A state initiative authorized legalized gaming in Deadwood to start on November 1, 1989. The introduction of gaming has enabled Deadwood to preserve its historic buildings and dramatically increase tourism. The lure of gaming is not the only draw to Deadwood; people are also fascinated by its unique, colorful history.] Download Original Image
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