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Souvenir Mining Spoon Goldfield, NV
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Souvenir Mining Spoon Bowl Goldfield, NV
  Souvenir Mining Spoon Handle Goldfield, NV.JPG - SOUVENIR MINING SPOON GOLDFIELD NV - Sterling silver spoon with engraved scene of miner’s pack mule in gold washed bowl, marked GOLDFIELD,NEVADA, ca. 1905, back marked Sterling with maker’s mark, made by Joseph Mayer & Bros., Seattle, WA 1895-1945, figural handle with wire wrap has miner’s gold pan with nuggets and pick and shovel marked NEVADA in pan on handle and double-sided pack mule on top, length 5 5/8 in. and weight 24 g  [Goldfield is an unincorporated community and the county seat of Esmeralda County, Nevada. It had a resident population of 268 in the 2010 census and is located 247 miles southeast of Carson City.  Goldfield was a boomtown in the first decade of the 20th century due to the discovery of gold.  The town was the site of a rare post-1900 major gold discovery, unusual in that most major discoveries in the lower 48 occurred before 1880. The ore initially was very rich, spurring rapid growth of the town from 1902 until 1906. The Goldfield Mining District was discovered in late 1902 and the Combination Lode was located in 1903 and the major rush followed.  From 1903 to 1910, Goldfield was the largest city in Nevada, peaking at 30,000 residents in 1908, the year the Goldfield Consolidated Mines Company erected a 100-stamp mill. The town was called the "Queen of the Mining Camps" for its luxury and availability of saloons and other forms of entertainment, including its many sporting houses. During this time, building lots often sold for as much as $45,000. In addition to its numerous saloons, the town boasted three newspapers, five banks and a mining stock exchange. Like so many boomtowns, labor difficulties soon followed.  After mining on an extensive scale began, the miners organized themselves as a local branch of the Western Federation of Miners. The Goldfield Consolidated Mines Company, primarily owned by George Wingfield, held a virtual monopoly in the town which led to an adversarial relationship between mine owners and the unions.  There were several strikes in December 1906 and January 1907 for higher wages, with more strikes continuing throughout the year for various reasons.  Ultimately federal troops were stationed in Goldfield from December 1907 to March 1908.  Goldfield experienced one of the most dramatic rises and subsequent crashes of all the mining towns of the Old West.  By 1908 ore production was already in steep decline and by 1910, the population of Goldfield dropped below 5,000.  In 1912, gold production had dropped from its former high of 11 million dollars per year to 5 million dollars and by 1918, the mines produced only 1 ½ million dollars in ore, with half that amount in the next year. By 1920, the town was called home to only about 1,500 residents and for the next three years, only a cumulative $150,000 in ore was produced by the area mines.  Much of the town was destroyed by a fire in 1923, although several buildings survived and remain today, notably the Goldfield Hotel, the Consolidated Mines Building, and the schoolhouse.  Between 1903 and 1940, Goldfield's mines produced more than $86 million.  Gold exploration continues in and around the town today.]  
Souvenir Mining Spoon Back Goldfield, NV
Richest Hill Butte MT Anaconda Mine in Background c1905 Photo
Souvenir Mining Spoon Anaconda Mine
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Souvenir Mining Spoon Bowl Anaconda Mine

Souvenir Mining Spoon Handle Goldfield, NV | SOUVENIR MINING SPOON GOLDFIELD NV - Sterling silver spoon with engraved scene of miner’s pack mule in gold washed bowl, marked GOLDFIELD, NEVADA, ca. 1905, back marked Sterling with maker’s mark, made by Joseph Mayer & Bros., Seattle, WA 1895-1945, figural handle with wire wrap has miner’s gold pan with nuggets and pick and shovel marked NEVADA in pan on handle and double-sided pack mule on top, length 5 5/8 in. and weight 24 g [Goldfield is an unincorporated community and the county seat of Esmeralda County, Nevada. It had a resident population of 268 in the 2010 census and is located 247 miles southeast of Carson City. Goldfield was a boomtown in the first decade of the 20th century due to the discovery of gold. The town was the site of a rare post-1900 major gold discovery, unusual in that most major discoveries in the lower 48 occurred before 1880. The ore initially was very rich, spurring rapid growth of the town from 1902 until 1906. The Goldfield Mining District was discovered in late 1902 and the Combination Lode was located in 1903 and the major rush followed. From 1903 to 1910, Goldfield was the largest city in Nevada, peaking at 30,000 residents in 1908, the year the Goldfield Consolidated Mines Company erected a 100-stamp mill. The town was called the "Queen of the Mining Camps" for its luxury and availability of saloons and other forms of entertainment, including its many sporting houses. During this time, building lots often sold for as much as $45,000. In addition to its numerous saloons, the town boasted three newspapers, five banks and a mining stock exchange. Like so many boomtowns, labor difficulties soon followed. After mining on an extensive scale began, the miners organized themselves as a local branch of the Western Federation of Miners. The Goldfield Consolidated Mines Company, primarily owned by George Wingfield, held a virtual monopoly in the town which led to an adversarial relationship between mine owners and the unions. There were several strikes in December 1906 and January 1907 for higher wages, with more strikes continuing throughout the year for various reasons. Ultimately federal troops were stationed in Goldfield from December 1907 to March 1908. Goldfield experienced one of the most dramatic rises and subsequent crashes of all the mining towns of the Old West. By 1908 ore production was already in steep decline and by 1910, the population of Goldfield dropped below 5,000. In 1912, gold production had dropped from its former high of 11 million dollars per year to 5 million dollars and by 1918, the mines produced only 1 ½ million dollars in ore, with half that amount in the next year. By 1920, the town was called home to only about 1,500 residents and for the next three years, only a cumulative $150,000 in ore was produced by the area mines. Much of the town was destroyed by a fire in 1923, although several buildings survived and remain today, notably the Goldfield Hotel, the Consolidated Mines Building, and the schoolhouse. Between 1903 and 1940, Goldfield's mines produced more than $86 million. Gold exploration continues in and around the town today.] Download Original Image
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