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Souvenir Mining Spoon Nome Alaska
Souvenir Placer Mining Spoon Nome Alaska
Souvenir Placer Mining Spoon Bowl Nome Alaska
Souvenir Placer Mining Spoon Reverse Nome Alaska
Treadwell Mine 1899
  Souvenir Mining Spoon Juneau Alaska.JPG - SOUVENIR MINING SPOON JUNEAU ALASKA - Sterling silver souvenir spoon,engraved scene in bowl showing coastal area with mountains and houses, marked JUNEAU ALASKA, decorative handle with gold pan, picks and shovel and bucket on rope, marked ALASKA, reverse shows decorative design with state map on handle with Sterling and makers mark, 5 3/4 in. long  [Juneau is the capital city of Alaska. It is a unified municipality located on the Gastineau Channel in the Alaskan panhandle, and is the second largest city in the United States by area.  Juneau has been the capital of Alaska since 1906, when the government of what was then the District of Alaska was moved from Sitka as dictated by the U.S. Congress in 1900. The municipality unified on July 1, 1970, when the city of Juneau merged with the city of Douglas and the surrounding Greater Juneau Borough to form the current home rule municipality.  In 1880 a local inhabitant, Chief Kowee, revealed to prospectors Joe Juneau and Richard Harris the presence of gold in what is now named Gold Creek in Silver Bow Basin.  On October 18, 1880 the city of Juneau was founded when Juneau and Harris staked a 160 acre town site on the beach where, the following month, they were joined by the first boatloads of prospectors bound for the new strike on Gastineau Channel. The stampede was on. The strike sparked the Juneau gold rush which resulted in the development of many placer and lode mines of the Juneau mining district including the largest, in their time, gold mines in the world: the Treadwell complex of lode mines on Douglas Island (across a narrow sea channel from Juneau) and the AJ lode mine, in Juneau itself.  The Juneau mining district comprising the area between the Canadian border, Lynn Canal, Admiralty Island, and Frederick Sound, has produced over 7 million ounces of lode gold and 80,000 ounces of placer gold. The first claims of what was to become the Treadwell complex were staked in 1881. Mining the Treadwell site began by sluicing residual placers over the lode deposits.  Underground mining began with a five-stamp mill operating in 1883. In the mid-1910s, with 960 stamps grinding ore and tunnels reaching as far as 2,400 feet below the surface and extending under the sea, Treadwell was one of the most technologically advanced mines of its day. Up to 2000 people worked at the mine before a collapse allowed the rising tide to flood the tunnels in 1917. All operations at the Treadwell ceased by 1922. During 1890 to 1915, many smaller mines came to be established in addition to the Treadwell. The smaller mines were: the Sumdum Chief, the Crystal, Comet, Jualin, Silver Queen, and Eagle River mines.  By 1917 the smaller mines had also folded up. As the Treadwell mines declined and closed, the AJ (Alaska Juneau) mine rose in prominence. After years of losses and labor problems, the mine became profitable in the mid-1920s: with 600 workers it was setting production records. Through the decade, it was the main economic engine of Juneau. In the 1930s, with 1000 workers, it was an important factor in softening the impact upon Juneau of the Great Depression. Economic pressures of WWII lead to the closure of the AJ in 1944; this was the end of the dominance of mining in the Juneau economy.]    
Souvenir Mining Spoon Juneau Alaska Town
Souvenir Mining Spoon Bowl Juneau Alaska
Souvenir Mining Spoon Reverse Juneau Alaska
Main Street Boise ID 1866
Souvenir Mining Spoon Boise, Idaho

Souvenir Mining Spoon Juneau Alaska | SOUVENIR MINING SPOON JUNEAU ALASKA - Sterling silver souvenir spoon, engraved scene in bowl showing coastal area with mountains and houses, marked JUNEAU ALASKA, decorative handle with gold pan, picks and shovel and bucket on rope, marked ALASKA, reverse shows decorative design with state map on handle with Sterling and makers mark, 5 3/4 in. long [Juneau is the capital city of Alaska. It is a unified municipality located on the Gastineau Channel in the Alaskan panhandle, and is the second largest city in the United States by area. Juneau has been the capital of Alaska since 1906, when the government of what was then the District of Alaska was moved from Sitka as dictated by the U.S. Congress in 1900. The municipality unified on July 1, 1970, when the city of Juneau merged with the city of Douglas and the surrounding Greater Juneau Borough to form the current home rule municipality. In 1880 a local inhabitant, Chief Kowee, revealed to prospectors Joe Juneau and Richard Harris the presence of gold in what is now named Gold Creek in Silver Bow Basin. On October 18, 1880 the city of Juneau was founded when Juneau and Harris staked a 160 acre town site on the beach where, the following month, they were joined by the first boatloads of prospectors bound for the new strike on Gastineau Channel. The stampede was on. The strike sparked the Juneau gold rush which resulted in the development of many placer and lode mines of the Juneau mining district including the largest, in their time, gold mines in the world: the Treadwell complex of lode mines on Douglas Island (across a narrow sea channel from Juneau) and the AJ lode mine, in Juneau itself. The Juneau mining district comprising the area between the Canadian border, Lynn Canal, Admiralty Island, and Frederick Sound, has produced over 7 million ounces of lode gold and 80,000 ounces of placer gold. The first claims of what was to become the Treadwell complex were staked in 1881. Mining the Treadwell site began by sluicing residual placers over the lode deposits. Underground mining began with a five-stamp mill operating in 1883. In the mid-1910s, with 960 stamps grinding ore and tunnels reaching as far as 2,400 feet below the surface and extending under the sea, Treadwell was one of the most technologically advanced mines of its day. Up to 2000 people worked at the mine before a collapse allowed the rising tide to flood the tunnels in 1917. All operations at the Treadwell ceased by 1922. During 1890 to 1915, many smaller mines came to be established in addition to the Treadwell. The smaller mines were: the Sumdum Chief, the Crystal, Comet, Jualin, Silver Queen, and Eagle River mines. By 1917 the smaller mines had also folded up. As the Treadwell mines declined and closed, the AJ (Alaska Juneau) mine rose in prominence. After years of losses and labor problems, the mine became profitable in the mid-1920s: with 600 workers it was setting production records. Through the decade, it was the main economic engine of Juneau. In the 1930s, with 1000 workers, it was an important factor in softening the impact upon Juneau of the Great Depression. Economic pressures of WWII lead to the closure of the AJ in 1944; this was the end of the dominance of mining in the Juneau economy.] Download Original Image
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