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1910 Mizpah Mine Tonopah NV - Copy
Souvenir Mining Spoon Mizpah Mine Tonopah NV
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Souvenir Mining Spoon Mizpah Mine
  Souvenir Mining Spoon Mizpah Mine Reverse.JPG - SOUVENIR MINING SPOON MIZPAH MINE TONOPAH NV - Sterling silver souvenir demitasse spoon, features handle with miners and marked NEVADA, bowl withdetailed engraving of Mizpah mine scene and marked MIZPAH MINE & MT. BROUGHER at top and TONOPAH across bottom, length 4 1/8 in., marked on reverse Sterling and maker’s mark of S in a circle for Shepard Mfg. Co. MelroseHighlands, MA 1893-1923 (Mt. Brougher is a 6,500 ft. summit just to the west of Tonopah town) [Tonopah is an unincorporated town and the county seat of Nye County, Nevada. It is located approximately midway between Las Vegas and Reno.  One of the richest booms in the west occurred at Tonopah Springs on May 19, 1900. And the name Jim Butler will forever be associated with the name Tonopah and the many stories that surround the discovery. The legendary tale of discovery says that he went looking for a burro that had wandered off during the night and sought shelter near a rock outcropping. When Butler discovered the animal the next morning, he picked up a rock to throw at it in frustration, noticing that the rock was unusually heavy. He had stumbled upon the second-richest silver strike in Nevada history. News of the discovery traveled to the Klondike and soon scores of eager prospectors were searching the area. But it was not until August 27, 1900 that Butler and his wife filed on eight claims near the springs, six of which were some of the biggest producers the state has ever had including the Desert Queen, Burro, Valley View, Silver Top, Buckboard, and Mizpah, the largest silver producer in the district. Because the Butler claims were known far and wide, the town was often referred to as Butler. By the summer of 1901, the mines around the town produced nearly $750,000 worth of gold and silver. Now it was time for a post office and one opened on April 10, 1901 named Butler.  By 1902 Jim Butler had sold his claims, which were all consolidated and gave birth to a new company, the Tonopah Mining Company. It was incorporated in Delaware, with stock listed on both the Philadelphia and San Francisco exchanges. The company, with J.H. Whiteman as president, controlled 160 acres of mineral-bearing ground around the Tonopah district. The company also had holdings in the Tonopah-Goldfield Railroad and controlled mining companies in Colorado, Canada, California and Nicaragua. The mine workings at Tonopah consisted of three deep shafts with more than 46 miles of lateral workings. The deepest of the three shafts was 1,500 ft. The ore mined at the site was treated in a 100-stamp mill. Also in 1902 the Tonopah-Belmont Mining Company was formed and was based in New Jersey with C.A. Heller as president. The company’s property, 11 claims covering more than 160 acres, was on the east side of the property owned by the Tonopah Mining Company. There were two deep vertical shafts, 1,200 and 1,700 ft, with workings covering almost 39 miles.  Butler now had a population of 650 and was increasing every day. It also had six saloons, restaurants, assay offices, lodging houses, and a number of doctors and lawyers. It was not until March 3, 1905 that its name was changed to Tonopah. By 1907, Tonopah had become a full-fledged city with modern hotels, electric and water companies, five banks, schools, and hundreds of other buildings. Tonopah’s mines continued to produce extremely well until the Depression brought a slowdown. From 1900 to 1921, they produced ore worth almost $121 million. Tonopah’s biggest year was 1913 when its mines yielded almost $10 million worth of gold, silver, copper, and lead. By the time World War II started, only four major mining companies were operating in Tonopah. At the end of the war even the companies that had been there at the beginning were gone. In 1968, Howard Hughes and his Summa Corporation bought 100 claims in Tonopah, including the Mizpah, Silver Top, and Desert Queen mines. Hopes for a mining revival soon faded after disappointing core samples were taken. A few of the old mines were re-timbered but never reopened. The value of the Tonopah district’s total production is just over $150 million.  Today tourism plays a large part in the local economy.]  
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Souvenir Mining Spoon Mizpah Mine Reverse | SOUVENIR MINING SPOON MIZPAH MINE TONOPAH NV - Sterling silver souvenir demitasse spoon, features handle with miners and marked NEVADA, bowl with detailed engraving of Mizpah mine scene and marked MIZPAH MINE & MT. BROUGHER at top and TONOPAH across bottom, length 4 1/8 in., marked on reverse Sterling and maker’s mark of S in a circle for Shepard Mfg. Co. Melrose Highlands, MA 1893-1923 (Mt. Brougher is a 6,500 ft. summit just to the west of Tonopah town) [Tonopah is an unincorporated town and the county seat of Nye County, Nevada. It is located approximately midway between Las Vegas and Reno. One of the richest booms in the west occurred at Tonopah Springs on May 19, 1900. And the name Jim Butler will forever be associated with the name Tonopah and the many stories that surround the discovery. The legendary tale of discovery says that he went looking for a burro that had wandered off during the night and sought shelter near a rock outcropping. When Butler discovered the animal the next morning, he picked up a rock to throw at it in frustration, noticing that the rock was unusually heavy. He had stumbled upon the second-richest silver strike in Nevada history. News of the discovery traveled to the Klondike and soon scores of eager prospectors were searching the area. But it was not until August 27, 1900 that Butler and his wife filed on eight claims near the springs, six of which were some of the biggest producers the state has ever had including the Desert Queen, Burro, Valley View, Silver Top, Buckboard, and Mizpah, the largest silver producer in the district. Because the Butler claims were known far and wide, the town was often referred to as Butler. By the summer of 1901, the mines around the town produced nearly $750,000 worth of gold and silver. Now it was time for a post office and one opened on April 10, 1901 named Butler. By 1902 Jim Butler had sold his claims, which were all consolidated and gave birth to a new company, the Tonopah Mining Company. It was incorporated in Delaware, with stock listed on both the Philadelphia and San Francisco exchanges. The company, with J.H. Whiteman as president, controlled 160 acres of mineral-bearing ground around the Tonopah district. The company also had holdings in the Tonopah-Goldfield Railroad and controlled mining companies in Colorado, Canada, California and Nicaragua. The mine workings at Tonopah consisted of three deep shafts with more than 46 miles of lateral workings. The deepest of the three shafts was 1,500 ft. The ore mined at the site was treated in a 100-stamp mill. Also in 1902 the Tonopah-Belmont Mining Company was formed and was based in New Jersey with C.A. Heller as president. The company’s property, 11 claims covering more than 160 acres, was on the east side of the property owned by the Tonopah Mining Company. There were two deep vertical shafts, 1,200 and 1,700 ft, with workings covering almost 39 miles. Butler now had a population of 650 and was increasing every day. It also had six saloons, restaurants, assay offices, lodging houses, and a number of doctors and lawyers. It was not until March 3, 1905 that its name was changed to Tonopah. By 1907, Tonopah had become a full-fledged city with modern hotels, electric and water companies, five banks, schools, and hundreds of other buildings. Tonopah’s mines continued to produce extremely well until the Depression brought a slowdown. From 1900 to 1921, they produced ore worth almost $121 million. Tonopah’s biggest year was 1913 when its mines yielded almost $10 million worth of gold, silver, copper, and lead. By the time World War II started, only four major mining companies were operating in Tonopah. At the end of the war even the companies that had been there at the beginning were gone. In 1968, Howard Hughes and his Summa Corporation bought 100 claims in Tonopah, including the Mizpah, Silver Top, and Desert Queen mines. Hopes for a mining revival soon faded after disappointing core samples were taken. A few of the old mines were re-timbered but never reopened. The value of the Tonopah district’s total production is just over $150 million. Today tourism plays a large part in the local economy.] Download Original Image
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