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Souvenir Mining Spoon Handle Speculator Mine Butte Mining District MT
Souvenir Mining Spoon Reverse Speculator Mine Butte Mining Dist MT
Child Labor Pittston PA January 1911 photo
Souvenir Mining Spoon Pittston PA
Souvenir Mining Spoon Bowl Pittston PA
  Souvenir Mining Spoon Reverse Pittston PA.JPG - SOUVENIR MINING SPOON PITTSTON PA - Sterling silver spoon, 4 3/4 in. long, engraved colliery mining scene in gold-washed bowl with marking PITTSTON PA., ca.1900, reverse with Sterling marking, maker’s mark and PAT 1892  [Pittston is a city located within Pennsylvania's Coal Region in Luzerne County. Situated between Scranton and Wilkes-Barre, the city gained prominence in the late 19th and early 20th centuries as an active anthracite coal mining city, drawing a large portion of its labor force from European immigrants. The population was 7,739 as of the 2010 census, making it the fourth largest city in Luzerne County. At its peak in 1920, the population of Pittston was 18,497.  The first discovery of anthracite coal in the Wyoming Valley occurred around 1770. The first mine was established in 1775 near Pittston. With the opening of a canal in the 1830s, Pittston became an important link in the coal industry. The anthracite and railroad industry attracted thousands of immigrants, making Pittston a true melting pot with once-distinct ethnic and class neighborhoods. The population of Pittston boomed in the late 19th century. The boom continued well into the 20th century. The anthracite coal mining industry, and its extensive use of child labor in the early part of the 20th century, was one of the industries targeted by the National Child Labor Committee and its hired photographer, Lewis Hine. Many of Hine's subjects were photographed in the mines and coal fields in and around Pittston between 1908 and 1912. The impact of the Hine photographs led to the enactment of child labor laws across the country.  Anthracite coal mining remained a major industry in the Pittston region until the Knox Mine Disaster. It essentially killed the industry in Northeastern Pennsylvania. On January 22, 1959, the ice-laden Susquehanna River broke through the roof of the River Slope Mine of the Knox Coal Company in nearby Port Griffith. This allowed for billions of gallons of river water to flood the interconnected mines. It took three days to plug the hole in the riverbed, which was done by dumping large railroad cars, smaller mine cars, culm, and other debris into the whirlpool formed by the water draining into the mine.  Sixty-nine miners escaped; twelve miners died and their bodies were never recovered.]  
Souvenir Mining Spoon Reverse Marking Pittston PA
Dawson City 1898 Photo
Souvenir Mining Spoon Dawson City Yukon Canada
Souvenir Mining Spoon Bowl Dawson City Yukon Canada
Souvenir Mining Spoon Handle Dawson City Yukon Canada

Souvenir Mining Spoon Reverse Pittston PA | SOUVENIR MINING SPOON PITTSTON PA - Sterling silver spoon, 4 3/4 in. long, engraved colliery mining scene in gold-washed bowl with marking PITTSTON PA., ca.1900, reverse with Sterling marking, maker’s mark and PAT 1892 [Pittston is a city located within Pennsylvania's Coal Region in Luzerne County. Situated between Scranton and Wilkes-Barre, the city gained prominence in the late 19th and early 20th centuries as an active anthracite coal mining city, drawing a large portion of its labor force from European immigrants. The population was 7,739 as of the 2010 census, making it the fourth largest city in Luzerne County. At its peak in 1920, the population of Pittston was 18,497. The first discovery of anthracite coal in the Wyoming Valley occurred around 1770. The first mine was established in 1775 near Pittston. With the opening of a canal in the 1830s, Pittston became an important link in the coal industry. The anthracite and railroad industry attracted thousands of immigrants, making Pittston a true melting pot with once-distinct ethnic and class neighborhoods. The population of Pittston boomed in the late 19th century. The boom continued well into the 20th century. The anthracite coal mining industry, and its extensive use of child labor in the early part of the 20th century, was one of the industries targeted by the National Child Labor Committee and its hired photographer, Lewis Hine. Many of Hine's subjects were photographed in the mines and coal fields in and around Pittston between 1908 and 1912. The impact of the Hine photographs led to the enactment of child labor laws across the country. Anthracite coal mining remained a major industry in the Pittston region until the Knox Mine Disaster. It essentially killed the industry in Northeastern Pennsylvania. On January 22, 1959, the ice-laden Susquehanna River broke through the roof of the River Slope Mine of the Knox Coal Company in nearby Port Griffith. This allowed for billions of gallons of river water to flood the interconnected mines. It took three days to plug the hole in the riverbed, which was done by dumping large railroad cars, smaller mine cars, culm, and other debris into the whirlpool formed by the water draining into the mine. Sixty-nine miners escaped; twelve miners died and their bodies were never recovered.] Download Original Image
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