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Tomboy_Mine_and_mill,_Tomboy_Colorado
Souvenir Mining Spoon Tomboy Mine Telluride CO
Souvenir Mining Spoon Tomboy Mine
Souvenir Mining Spoon Tomboy Mine Bowl Marking
Souvenir Mining Spoon Tomboy Mine Handle Marking
  Souvenir Mining Spoon Tomboy Mine Reverse.JPG - SOUVENIR MINING SPOON TOMBOY MINE AND MILL TELLURIDE CO - Sterling souvenir silver spoon, 5 1/8 in. long, engraved mining scene in bowl with marking TOMBOY MINE TELLURIDE COLO, marked COLUMBINE on handle, ca. 1900, back with Sterling marking (The Tomboy mine was one of the top three producers in the Telluride mining district along with the Smuggler-Union and the Liberty Bell (note the Liberty Bell Mill spoon along with a history of Telluride elsewhere in my spoon section).  Located in San Miguel County Colorado on the Imogene Pass road 2 miles east of Telluride at an elevation of 11,509 ft, the Tomboy mine started producing gold ore in 1894. The mine was in a mountainous region known as the Savage Basin and near a settlement that was originally named Savage Basin Camp. Eventually the settlement became known as Tomboy.  Today it’s one of the highest ghost towns in the United States.  William Bailey and O. P. Posey purchased the Tomboy mine in 1893 when it was merely a good prospect.  They formed a company with Bailey as president and Posey as general manager and the mine quickly became a remarkable producer.  In 1897 they sold controlling interest in the mine to the London Exploration Company headed by the wealthy Rothschild family from Europe for 2 million dollars. The early settlement of Tomboy contained a school, store, stable and miners’ cabins.  A daily stage ran across the shelf road carrying passengers and mail. Reports on the number of people living at the Tomboy camp vary widely with some stating several hundred and others more than a thousand. Whatever the figure, Tomboy was one of Colorado's largest alpine company mining camps, a significant community that lasted decades. The Tomboy mine had many amenities for its hundreds of employees including a YMCA with a bowling alley and tennis courts, and a club that held dances attended by Tomboy residents as well as residents from Telluride and surrounding mines. When the ore ran out in 1928, the Tomboy mine was closed and the camp was abandoned.)  
Yellow Aster Mine and Mill Randsburg CA ca 1900
Souvenir Mining Spoon Yellow Aster Mine and Mill
Souvenir Mining Spoon Yellow Aster Mine and Mill Randsburg CA
Souvenir Mining Spoon Yellow Aster Mine and Mill Bowl Marking
IMG_Souvenir Mining Spoon Yellow Aster Mine and Mill Reverse

Souvenir Mining Spoon Tomboy Mine Reverse | SOUVENIR MINING SPOON TOMBOY MINE AND MILL TELLURIDE CO - Sterling souvenir silver spoon, 5 1/8 in. long, engraved mining scene in bowl with marking TOMBOY MINE TELLURIDE COLO, marked COLUMBINE on handle, ca. 1900, back with Sterling marking (The Tomboy mine was one of the top three producers in the Telluride mining district along with the Smuggler-Union and the Liberty Bell (note the Liberty Bell Mill spoon along with a history of Telluride elsewhere in my spoon section). Located in San Miguel County Colorado on the Imogene Pass road 2 miles east of Telluride at an elevation of 11,509 ft, the Tomboy mine started producing gold ore in 1894. The mine was in a mountainous region known as the Savage Basin and near a settlement that was originally named Savage Basin Camp. Eventually the settlement became known as Tomboy. Today it’s one of the highest ghost towns in the United States. William Bailey and O. P. Posey purchased the Tomboy mine in 1893 when it was merely a good prospect. They formed a company with Bailey as president and Posey as general manager and the mine quickly became a remarkable producer. In 1897 they sold controlling interest in the mine to the London Exploration Company headed by the wealthy Rothschild family from Europe for 2 million dollars. The early settlement of Tomboy contained a school, store, stable and miners’ cabins. A daily stage ran across the shelf road carrying passengers and mail. Reports on the number of people living at the Tomboy camp vary widely with some stating several hundred and others more than a thousand. Whatever the figure, Tomboy was one of Colorado's largest alpine company mining camps, a significant community that lasted decades. The Tomboy mine had many amenities for its hundreds of employees including a YMCA with a bowling alley and tennis courts, and a club that held dances attended by Tomboy residents as well as residents from Telluride and surrounding mines. When the ore ran out in 1928, the Tomboy mine was closed and the camp was abandoned.) Download Original Image
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