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Souvenir Mining Spoon Elkton Mine Reverse
Silver City ID 1892
Souvenir Mining Spoon Trade Dollar Mill
Souvenir Mining Spoon Trade Dollar Mill Silver City ID
Souvenir Mining Spoon Trade Dollar Mill Bowl
  Souvenir Mining Spoon Trade Dollar Mill Reverse.JPG - SOUVENIR MINING SPOON TRADE DOLLAR MILL SILVER CITY ID - Sterling silver souvenir demitasse spoon, 3 7/8 inches long, bowl engraved with mine buildingsscene and marked TRADE DOLLAR MILL SILVER CITY IDAHO, reverse marked Sterling with Towle makers mark (founded in 1882 Newburyport, MA)  [Silver City, Idaho is about 70 miles southwest of Boise, and is a partially-restored 19th century abandoned mining town, which once found fortune with gold and silver. There are around 70 buildings that are still standing.  Laid out by Colonel William H. Dewey in 1864, the Silver City area surrounded by the Owyhee Mountains produced more than 60 million dollars of precious metals from its mines. During its heydays Silver City had about a dozen streets, seventy-five businesses, three hundred homes, a population of around 2,500, twelve ore-processing mills, and was the Owyhee County seat from 1866 to 1934. Some of the largest stage lines in the West operated in the area, and Silver City had the first telegraph and the first daily newspaper in the territory in 1874. Telephones were in use here at least by 1880, and the town was electrified in the 1890's. Between 1863 and 1865, more than two hundred and fifty mines were in operation. Two of the major mines around Silver City were the Black Jack and Trade Dollar, both located on Florida Mountain.  The Black Jack on the mountain’s north slope was worked as early as 1865 and intermittently until 1890.  The Trade Dollar mine and mill, located on the mountain’s south slope, was developed somewhat later.  Both mines seemed to have a resurgence around 1890.  The Black Jack at the time was owned by the Idaho and Pittsburgh Mining and Milling Company and the Trade Dollar was owned by the Trade Dollar Mining and Milling Company. In 1899 the mines were consolidated into a single company, the Trade Dollar Consolidated Mining Company, with James Hutchinson as the superintendent. At its high point around 1907, the company had over 25 lineal miles of workings for which the Florida Mountain tunnel at Dewey was the major haulage level and for which Dewey was the major milling site. The ghost town of Dewey, named for W. H. Dewey, is located a little over 2 miles to the northwest of Silver City.  The peak annual production of gold and silver was somewhat in excess of one million dollars.  However within a few years the mine’s production tailed off and by January 1911, the Trade Dollar Mine charter was forfeited. At the present time, there are no major mines operating in the area. ]  
Bi-Metallic Mill Philipsburg MT 1890 Photo
Souvenir Mining Spoon Bi-Metallic Mill Philipsburg MT
Souvenir Mining Spoon Bi-Metallic Mill
Souvenir Mining Spoon Bi-Metallic Mill Bowl
Souvenir Mining Spoon Bi-Metallic Mill Reverse

Souvenir Mining Spoon Trade Dollar Mill Reverse | SOUVENIR MINING SPOON TRADE DOLLAR MILL SILVER CITY ID - Sterling silver souvenir demitasse spoon, 3 7/8 inches long, bowl engraved with mine buildings scene and marked TRADE DOLLAR MILL SILVER CITY IDAHO, reverse marked Sterling with Towle makers mark (founded in 1882 Newburyport, MA) [Silver City, Idaho is about 70 miles southwest of Boise, and is a partially-restored 19th century abandoned mining town, which once found fortune with gold and silver. There are around 70 buildings that are still standing. Laid out by Colonel William H. Dewey in 1864, the Silver City area surrounded by the Owyhee Mountains produced more than 60 million dollars of precious metals from its mines. During its heydays Silver City had about a dozen streets, seventy-five businesses, three hundred homes, a population of around 2,500, twelve ore-processing mills, and was the Owyhee County seat from 1866 to 1934. Some of the largest stage lines in the West operated in the area, and Silver City had the first telegraph and the first daily newspaper in the territory in 1874. Telephones were in use here at least by 1880, and the town was electrified in the 1890's. Between 1863 and 1865, more than two hundred and fifty mines were in operation. Two of the major mines around Silver City were the Black Jack and Trade Dollar, both located on Florida Mountain. The Black Jack on the mountain’s north slope was worked as early as 1865 and intermittently until 1890. The Trade Dollar mine and mill, located on the mountain’s south slope, was developed somewhat later. Both mines seemed to have a resurgence around 1890. The Black Jack at the time was owned by the Idaho and Pittsburgh Mining and Milling Company and the Trade Dollar was owned by the Trade Dollar Mining and Milling Company. In 1899 the mines were consolidated into a single company, the Trade Dollar Consolidated Mining Company, with James Hutchinson as the superintendent. At its high point around 1907, the company had over 25 lineal miles of workings for which the Florida Mountain tunnel at Dewey was the major haulage level and for which Dewey was the major milling site. The ghost town of Dewey, named for W. H. Dewey, is located a little over 2 miles to the northwest of Silver City. The peak annual production of gold and silver was somewhat in excess of one million dollars. However within a few years the mine’s production tailed off and by January 1911, the Trade Dollar Mine charter was forfeited. At the present time, there are no major mines operating in the area. ] Download Original Image
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