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Souvenir Mining Spoon Bi-Metallic Mill Bowl
Souvenir Mining Spoon Bi-Metallic Mill Reverse
Mineral Springs Colliery Wilkes-Barre PA 1913 Photo
Souvenir Mining Spoon Wilkes-Barre PA
Souvenir Mining Spoon Wilkes-Barre
  Souvenir Mining Spoon Wilkes-Barre Bowl.JPG - SOUVENIR MINING SPOON WILKES-BARRE PA - Sterling silver souvenir demitassespoon, 4 in. long, bowl engraved with colliery buildings and marked WILKES-BARRE, handle marked with image of William Penn and Liberty Bell with Pennsylvania, reverse marked Sterling and maker’s mark of Mechanics Sterling Co. (Attleboro, MA 1896 - ?), reverse handle marked with pick and shovel along with state seal  [Wilkes-Barre is in the center of the Wyoming Valley anthracite coal region in northeastern Pennsylvania.  Founded in 1769, it was originally named Wyoming but renamed later in honor of two British members of parliament, John Wilkes and Col. Issac Barre, who defended the American colonies in parliamentary debates.  In 1818, Wilkes-Barre was incorporated as a borough, with a city charter following in 1871.  Coal mining was the most important element of the city’s economy.   Hundreds of thousands of immigrants flocked to the city; they were seeking jobs in the numerous mines and collieries that sprang up.  Wilkes-Barre’s population exploded as the city became a center of supply to support these mines.  In 1914 employment at the anthracite mines reached a maximum of 180,000 workers.  Anthracite production peaked in 1917 at over 100 million tons with 776 mines in operation.  The anthracite industry went into steady decline after World War I.  The primary reason was competition from abundant supplies of lower cost oil and gas.  A large drop in anthracite production occurred during the Depression with only a small bounce-back during World War II.  The earlier downward trend continued after the War.  In 1959, The Knox Mine near Wilkes-Barre broke through the bottom of the Susquehanna River, flooding the underground mines and ending deep coal  production in the area.]  
Souvenir Mining Spoon Wilkes-Barre Handle
Souvenir Mining Spoon Wilkes-Barre Reverse Handle
Souvenir Mining Spoon Wilkes-Barre Reverse
Empire Mine 1895 Photo
Souvenir Mining Spoon Empire Mine Grass Valley CA

Souvenir Mining Spoon Wilkes-Barre Bowl | SOUVENIR MINING SPOON WILKES-BARRE PA - Sterling silver souvenir demitasse spoon, 4 in. long, bowl engraved with colliery buildings and marked WILKES-BARRE, handle marked with image of William Penn and Liberty Bell with Pennsylvania, reverse marked Sterling and maker’s mark of Mechanics Sterling Co. (Attleboro, MA 1896 - ?), reverse handle marked with pick and shovel along with state seal [Wilkes-Barre is in the center of the Wyoming Valley anthracite coal region in northeastern Pennsylvania. Founded in 1769, it was originally named Wyoming but renamed later in honor of two British members of parliament, John Wilkes and Col. Issac Barre, who defended the American colonies in parliamentary debates. In 1818, Wilkes-Barre was incorporated as a borough, with a city charter following in 1871. Coal mining was the most important element of the city’s economy. Hundreds of thousands of immigrants flocked to the city; they were seeking jobs in the numerous mines and collieries that sprang up. Wilkes-Barre’s population exploded as the city became a center of supply to support these mines. In 1914 employment at the anthracite mines reached a maximum of 180,000 workers. Anthracite production peaked in 1917 at over 100 million tons with 776 mines in operation. The anthracite industry went into steady decline after World War I. The primary reason was competition from abundant supplies of lower cost oil and gas. A large drop in anthracite production occurred during the Depression with only a small bounce-back during World War II. The earlier downward trend continued after the War. In 1959, The Knox Mine near Wilkes-Barre broke through the bottom of the Susquehanna River, flooding the underground mines and ending deep coal production in the area.] Download Original Image
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