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  002.JPG - U.M.W. of A. RIBBON LOCAL 1097 PIEDMONT, W. VA. - Red, white and blue United Mine Workers of America ribbon/badge showing 8 hours shaking hands symbol and crossed flags on badge and marked LOCAL UNION NO. 1097 U. M. W. of A. PIEDMONT, W. VA. on ribbon, 8 1/2 in. long and 2 1/4 in. wide, the reverse side is a black memoriam ribbon for funerals of fellow miners (UMW or UMWA is a North American labor union best known for representing coal miners and coal technicians.  The UMW was founded in Columbus, Ohio, on January 22, 1890, with the merger of two old labor groups, the Knights of Labor Trade Assembly No. 135 and the National Progressive Miners Union.  Adopting the model of the American Federation of Labor (AFL), the union was initially established as a three-pronged labor tool: to develop mine safety; to improve mine workers' independence from the mine owners and the company store; and to provide miners with collective bargaining power. After passage of the National Recovery Act in 1933, organizers spread throughout the United States to organize all coal miners into labor unions.  At some point before 1930, the UMW became a member of the American Federation of Labor. The UMW leadership was part of the driving force to change the way workers were organized, and the UMW was one of the charter members when the new Congress of Industrial Organizations was formed in 1935. However, the AFL leadership did not agree with the philosophy of industrial unionization, and the UMW and nine other unions that had formed the CIO were kicked out of the AFL in 1937.  In 1942, the UMW chose to leave the CIO, and, for the next five years, were an independent union.  In 1947, the UMW once again joined the AFL, but the remarriage was a short one, as the UMW was forced out of the AFL in 1948, and at that point, became the largest non-affiliated union in the United States.  The UMW spent the 1980s healing the rift between the UMW and the now-conjoined AFL-CIO (which was created in 1955 with the merger of the AFL and the CIO). In 1989, the UMW was again taken into the fold of the large union umbrella.)  
WFM Butte No 1 Ribbon
IMG_3000
WFM Eureka No 151 Ribbon
WFM Eureka
WFM Eureka No 151 Member Badge

002 | U.M.W. of A. RIBBON LOCAL 1097 PIEDMONT, W. VA. - Red, white and blue United Mine Workers of America ribbon/badge showing 8 hours shaking hands symbol and crossed flags on badge and marked LOCAL UNION NO. 1097 U. M. W. of A. PIEDMONT, W. VA. on ribbon, 8 1/2 in. long and 2 1/4 in. wide, the reverse side is a black memoriam ribbon for funerals of fellow miners (UMW or UMWA is a North American labor union best known for representing coal miners and coal technicians. The UMW was founded in Columbus, Ohio, on January 22, 1890, with the merger of two old labor groups, the Knights of Labor Trade Assembly No. 135 and the National Progressive Miners Union. Adopting the model of the American Federation of Labor (AFL), the union was initially established as a three-pronged labor tool: to develop mine safety; to improve mine workers' independence from the mine owners and the company store; and to provide miners with collective bargaining power. After passage of the National Recovery Act in 1933, organizers spread throughout the United States to organize all coal miners into labor unions. At some point before 1930, the UMW became a member of the American Federation of Labor. The UMW leadership was part of the driving force to change the way workers were organized, and the UMW was one of the charter members when the new Congress of Industrial Organizations was formed in 1935. However, the AFL leadership did not agree with the philosophy of industrial unionization, and the UMW and nine other unions that had formed the CIO were kicked out of the AFL in 1937. In 1942, the UMW chose to leave the CIO, and, for the next five years, were an independent union. In 1947, the UMW once again joined the AFL, but the remarriage was a short one, as the UMW was forced out of the AFL in 1948, and at that point, became the largest non-affiliated union in the United States. The UMW spent the 1980s healing the rift between the UMW and the now-conjoined AFL-CIO (which was created in 1955 with the merger of the AFL and the CIO). In 1989, the UMW was again taken into the fold of the large union umbrella.) Download Original Image
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